Author Archives: jaynecoster

Cannabis Legalization: Should Wisconsin Do So?

Angela Janis 5 12 2021Dr. Angela Janis discussed the basics of medical cannabis at the May 12 Rotary meeting. Janis is a Psychiatrist at Mendota Mental Health Institute.

THC, the most active ingredient in cannabis, gets you high, but it also decreases pain, nausea, and helps you sleep. CBD doesn’t get you high, is not addictive, but probably decreases inflammation, anxiety and pain. CBD may counter the effect of THC.

Cannabis forms include flowers, edibles, concentrations such as vapes/oils, tinctures (to put under your tongue) topicals (for skin) and nasal spray. Onset of effect differs in these forms; for example effects from eating is slower than topicals.

Wisconsin is behind in legalizing cannabis; we are surrounded by states who have, led by California in 1996 (with medical use). Thirty-five states have fully legalized; many more allow medical marijuana. Several have decriminalized.

“We may be one of the last states to legalize” Janis said. “Nationally, we are behind on medical research; it’s the only drug where the national institute on drug abuse has to supply the material.” Janis said the institute gives research cannabis only to a small number of studies; 96% of studies receiving material are looking for harms.

“Their mission is about abuse, which may direct their research interest,” she said.

Most people use medical cannabis for pain, muscle spasms, nausea (especially for cancer), seizures, PTSD and end of life care. Since PTSD doesn’t have a proven treatment, anecdotal support for cannabis is accepted; there is good data for the other issues.

Janis reported cannabis does not take away pain like an opioid, but it has a much higher safety rate.

She added, “Don’t listen to someone who says, “Nobody is addicted to cannabis,” but the risk is much lower, similar to caffeine and lower than tobacco.” As with all drugs, the younger you begin using the drug, dependence is higher. Youth use is the biggest risk. Treatment includes behavioral therapy and possibly gabapentin.

When asked how legalizing cannabis would affect Wisconsin’s tavern industry, Janis reported alcohol sales dropped only slightly when cannabis was legalized in other states.

Our thanks to Dr. Angela Janis for her presentation this week and to Valerie Renk for preparing this review article. We also thank WisEye for streaming our meeting this week. If you missed our meeting this week, you can watch it here: https://youtu.be/IiibynhFL7w.

Patrick Lucey’s Lasting Legacy for Wisconsin

Dennis Dresang shared the legacy of former Governor Patrick Lucey May 5.

“Lucey professionalized state government from part-time citizen boards to professional civil service.  He reconceptualized taxes and spending to the system still with us. His term saw the most productive performance period, outdoing LaFollette,” Dresang said.

Growing up in rural Ferryville, shy Lucey wasn’t charismatic. He was described as analytical, professorial and demanding of staff.

Father Gregory Charles ran the family business, asking Lucy to join.  He now faced a crossroads: business or politics?  Faced with his fear of Joe McCarthy, Lucey chose politics.

In 1951, Lucey decided to marry, needing a career to support that. After turning to Jim Doyle, Sr, for advice, he became Dane County’s largest real estate dealer.  By 1969, when running for Governor, he’d embarked on $500 million Wexford Village.  

He was a progressive, with a reputation for bipartisanship, often reaching across the aisle. His first year in office, 50 years ago, his first initiatives were to create the UW System and to transform state taxing and spending systems. These were based on changes suggested by previous Governor Warren Knowles.

Local taxes at that time were rising 10% annually, because municipalities were responsible for schools and other taxes now elsewhere. Lucey was concerned about this burden on poorer communities. He created “equalization” formulas to give children the same education regardless of their community. He created a machinery and equipment tax exemption saying, “let’s tax income, not property.”  He also developed property tax levy limits. 

His ambitious agenda started as 24 items on one page; no-fault auto insurance was the only one not adopted during his term. He resigned to become Ambassador to Mexico when asked by President Carter.

His passion for social justice, opportunities for everyone to experience upward mobility, and problem solving are his legacy. 

Dresang is Professor Emeritus and founding director of La Follette School of Public Affairs.

Our thanks to Dennis Dresang for his presentation this week and to Valerie Renk for preparing this review article. Our thanks also to Mystery to Me Book Store for selling books at our club meeting as a convenience to our members. If you missed our meeting, you can visit Mystery to Me Book Store in person or click on this link to order it at their book store online:  https://www.mysterytomebooks.com/search/apachesolr_search/patrick%20lucey.  If you missed our meeting this week, you can watch it here:  https://youtu.be/wagy5bpFU7M.        

Goodman Center’s Message: “Be The One”

   Letesha Nelson, the CEO and Executive Director of the Goodman Community Center, was our speaker this week. She joined the Goodman Center, succeeding fellow Rotarian Becky Steinhoff, in January 2021. Ms. Nelson has a long history of non-profit work, having held leadership positions with the Girl Scouts of America for many years. She brings to her work an obvious passion and a joy in service to others.

   She finds motivation in her belief that it takes one person to change someone or even a community for the better, a concept captured by her personal motto, “Be the One.” She has been and intends to continue to be someone who can improve other people’s lives and direct them to a rewarding future. At the beginning of her career at the Girl Scouts, when she had self-doubts, her father (who himself worked to help people in inner-city Milwaukee) told her that “You are born to do it.” It’s clear that he was right.

   After fifteen years with the Scouts, she left for a job at Idlewild Baptist Church in Memphis, where she helped parents and children deal with adverse events in their life. These were affluent people. But they needed help. She learned that the right kind of help can be important for all people of whatever level of income.

   As the new head of the Goodman Community Center, she is learning what Goodman is all about: “Strengthening Lives and Securing Futures.” During the worst of the pandemic, Goodman stayed open to serve families with meals from the food pantry, providing school not only part time but all-day, with counselling about college and other career paths. They are now facilitating vaccinations in the community, which will help restore normality. The Center is already slowly and cautiously returning to a post-pandemic operation. They are looking to increase their connections to technical education for those not considering college.

   Becky Steinhoff is obviously a tough act to follow. But there is every indication that Letesha Nelson has the necessary drive and the pleasure in serving others. She is “born to do it” and “she is the one.” She is worthy of the great Rotarians Bob and Irwin Goodman.

   Our thanks to Letesha Nelson for her presentation this week and to Rich Leffler for preparing this review article.  If you missed our meeting this week, you can watch it here: https://youtu.be/AT8bJ7iozdg.

Environmental Issues in Understandable Terms

   Our guest speaker this week was Dr. Elizabeth Bagley, Director of Drawdown Learn at Project Drawdown, speaking to us on a pre-recorded video from Sitka, Alaska. Dr. Bagley received her undergraduate degree from UW-Madison as well as her Ph.D. jointly in Environment and Resources and Educational Psychology. She is clearly well suited to teach us about environmental issues in understandable terms.

   “Drawdown” refers to that point at which human-made atmospheric chemicals that support climate change and warming begin to decline. Dr. Bagley offered us a number of ways that we can arrive at this point of drawdown, beginning immediately. These solutions fall under three broad categories: Reduce the Sources of climate change; support the natural Heat Sinks that reduce these pollutants; and help Society make necessary changes. All of these solutions, she argues, are possible right now.

   Drawdown and ESRAG (an environmental group within Rotary International represented here by Paul Riehemann and Karen Kendrick-Hands) advocate planting millions of trees that will reduce carbon dioxide levels of the atmosphere. Support electricity reform such as solar and wind power. Reduce food waste and increase composting. Reduce leaks of harmful refrigerants into the atmosphere where they do their thing: trapping heat. Reform transportation by increasing the use of electric vehicles and bicycles. Heat sinks can be supported by agricultural practices, the planting of trees, and the restoration of damaged ecosystems. Society can be mobilized in the effort by reforming practices in health and education.

Dr. Bagley suggested solutions that are not pie-in-the-sky or wildly expensive, and that are actually already being done in places around the world with support from organizations like Rotary. She grew up on a sheep farm in western Wisconsin and earned undergraduate and graduate degrees from a great research university. The combination has produced an articulate, knowledgeable, and practical worker in the cause of preventing catastrophic change in our atmosphere.   Our thanks to Elizabeth Bagley for her presentation this week and to Rich Leffler for preparing this review article.  If you missed our meeting this week, you can watch it here:  https://youtu.be/zI899HBa4bI.  

“We Must Not Accept Complacency”

   On an historic day, when the Club returned to the Park Hotel for the first time in more than a year of pandemic isolation, our speaker was fellow Rotarian Jason Fields. Jason is the new president of the Madison Regional Economic Partnership. He spoke on the topic “We Must Not Accept Complacency.” The title derives from his belief that Madison is a great place to live and work, but his mission is to give his all for everyone he deals with, always. And he construes economic development to mean “to empower people.” All people. He is motivated by the question that his wife asked him: “Yes, Madison is a great place. But for who?” He briefly referred to the statistics we all know, that Wisconsin has huge disparities between its White and Black populations. He and his wife were themselves discriminated against while seeking a home here as they move from Milwaukee. This is never acceptable. Beyond the immorality of it, we have to send a message that this will not be tolerated if we really want to be competitive in attracting talent.

   Jason mentioned several issues that MadRep will be working on. One is broadband, which is not evenly available in the state, in rural areas and among minority populations. He will also be addressing the problem of unequal access to capital by various populations. A fund is being created. There is also a tension between Milwaukee and Madison that is unnecessary and harmful to development here and should be eliminated. We should unlearn Midwest modesty and learn to brag about ourselves to attract talent from Minnesota, Illinois, and the world. Another problem we face: We tend to “sacrifice progress to perfection.” Task forces talk, and nothing gets done. There has to be a sense of urgency.

   Jason is a man of diverse experiences. He has been a politician, a financial adviser, a banker, a radio show host, and a podcaster. He is a dynamic speaker. A man with passion and an idealism disciplined by reality. He will be a valuable member of the Club and the community.

   Our thanks to Jason Fields for his presentation this week and to Rich Leffler for preparing this review article.  If you missed our meeting this week, you can watch it here:  https://youtu.be/LBCqc9c_bcE.      

Accessibility for Everyone in Downtown Madison

   The speaker at our April 7th meeting was Jason Beloungy, Executive Director of Access to Independence, which is one of eight such organizations in Wisconsin.  It serves Columbia, Dane, Dodge and Green counties.  Today he spoke of the collaboration between his organization, the Downtown Madison’s Beyond Compliance Task Force, and the City of Madison’s Disability Rights Commission.

   The goal of this alliance is a fully inclusive and accessible downtown which includes entrances to buildings and within their interiors such as restrooms as well as the accessibility to outdoor events and parking opportunities.  Achievements of the last three years began with conducting a survey of persons facing barriers to accessibility that help prioritize the group’s efforts.  From this, two separate guides have been developed.

   The first was for streetory which involved entrances to buildings and the way to provide the best accesses to and within outdoor dining areas.  The second guide developed is for festivals and outdoor events.  The current project centers on “Well Built Conferences” which addresses designs and best practices for buildings.

   Jason feels that individuals and organizations can help by getting directly involved with the Disability Rights Commission; getting input from those with disabilities; hiring people with disabilities; and by promoting accessibility and inclusion.

   Our thanks to Jason Beloungy for his presentation this week and to Larry Larrabee for preparing this review article.  If you missed our meeting this week, you can watch it here:  https://youtu.be/IGFkTbDrKD8.