Tag Archives: Fellowship

New Member Coffee Event Held December 11

–submitted by Mary Borland; photos by Jason Beren

IMG_8775Several new members along with established members, gathered the morning of December 11 for networking and education.  Jason Beren led the meeting.

Guest speaker Victoria Gammino, an epidemiologist at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control,  presented information about Rotary International Polio Plus and the impressive work that has been done to try to eradicate polio. There is still work to be done internationally, especially in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria, so our continued contributions to the Rotary International fund are very much appreciated.

Cheryl Rosen Weston presented information about the Madison Rotary Foundation and how our club is unique in having a Foundation. Many clubs are much smaller than ours and only contribute to the Rotary International Fund. Our dollars, donated to the Madison Rotary Foundation, go right into our local community to fund important causes.  Roth Judd followed up Cheryl’s presentation with a wonderful visual chart that helps us all better understand where our monies flow, whether local or international.

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Doug Dittmann provided information on the Community Grants Committee.  Committee members make personal visits to prospective grant recipients and then share their findings with the rest of the committee to decide on specific funding to be provided. New members are encouraged to consider serving on this committee – you’ll learn a lot!

The next new member meeting is January 28 at 11:15am, prior to Rotary, and a plan will be started to roast President Tim!  Don’t miss this one!

Hiking the Snowy Trails at New Glarus State Park

–submitted by Andrea Kaminski; photos by Herman Baumann

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The Rotary Hiking Fellowship enjoyed the snow at New Glarus Woods State Park on Sunday, November 16. We met near the picnic shelter, where a friendly park ranger made sure we all had daily or annual state park passes on our cars. He was very proud of his park, and he stopped to take a photo of the group before we headed off on the Havenridge Trail.

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Equipped with printed park maps and multiple GPS devices, the consensus of the team was to simply follow the loop. According to Jeff Tews’ Fitbit, we hiked 4.3 miles and climbed the equivalent of 50 flights of stairs. After the trek, six of us went into New Glarus for a warm and tasty lunch at Kristi’s Bistro Cafe.

Going Green & Second Century Fellowship Groups Mix It Up at Aldo Leopold Nature Center

October 22, 2014.
–submitted by Karen Kendrick-Hands

From left: Bob Miller, Joanna Burish, Dick & Nina Rieselbach and Nino Amato

From left: Bob Miller, Joanna Burish, Dick & Nina Rieselbach and Nino Amato

Twenty members  accepted President Tim’s challenge to commingle our two fellowships when we met to tour the Aldo Leopold Nature Center [ALNC]. We shared hefty snacks, and hot cider as we made new friends, networked and found common ground.

We were greeted by the announcement screen gently celebrating our club’s vote to help RI dialogue about climate change.  Rotarian Bob Miller welcomed us to the Center in his role as ALNC’s new Executive Director, as well as to Monona, in his role as Mayor.

Bob shared how ALNC came to be an oasis of wildness: prairie, wetland, woodlands, with nature program for kids, just off the beltway. Director of Community Engagement Sierra Munoz gave us a tour of the Climate Science Education Center where thousands come annually to learn about climate, weather and earth science using high-tech interactive features found nowhere else in the region.

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(Photo 1: from left: Philip Petrowski, Mike Kosolcharoen, Michelle McGrath, James Tye, Larry Hands & Paul Riehemann; Photo 2: from left: Ellsworth Brown, Becky Stienhoff’s Mom, Kris Ashe and ALNC’s Sierra Munoz; Photo 3: from left: Lee Schwartz, Rob Ringeisen, Nick Curran and Tim Stadelman)

We were all intrigued with the “Science on the Sphere,” – the only one in Wisconsin – on which we watched NASA film clips of global storm tracks, night lighting patterns, jet stream waves and so much more.

Great minds are already pondering holding a  “family friendly Rotary event” at this hidden treasure.

We more than fulfilled District Governor Dave Warren’s wish that we have 10% more fun!

Culinary Arts Fellowship Group Enjoys Harvest Meal at The Madison Club

–submitted by Patty Struck; photos by Paul Hoffmann

Madison Club’s Chef Andrew Wilson gives a demonstration in preparing trout piperade for Rotarians and their guests.

Madison Club’s Chef Andrew Wilson gives a demonstration in preparing trout piperade for Rotarians and their guests.

A group of 25 Rotarians and guests gathered at The Madison Club for a Rotary Club Harvest Menu dinner organized by the Culinary Arts Fellowship Group on Monday, November 3.

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Following some time for socializing, we enjoyed a cooking demo by Chef Andrew Wilson in the Madison Club kitchen. Chef Wilson demonstrated his knife-wielding skills in the preparation of the fish course, trout piperade.

 

 

The evening concluded with a four-course meal – with appropriate wine pairings –  featuring sunchoke soup, trout piperade, gnocchi with beef, and brown butter cake with poached pear slices. Delicious!

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(Photo 1: Cindy Durham & Cathy Durham; Photo 2: Martha & Chuck Casey; Photo 3: Valerie & Andreas Kazamias)

To wrap up the evening, we toasted Valerie Kazamias for planning this delightful event!

“Rotary Bingo” at The Madison Club October 21, 2014

–summary & photos submitted by Jason Beren

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On Tuesday, October 21, at our New Member Event, about 25 new and experienced Rotarians attended a coffee event at The Madison Club (Thanks to Mary Gaffney-Ward for the use of the great room).

The focal point of the event was a cutting edge networking activity known as “Rotary Bingo.”  Much like a scavenger hunt played with a bingo card, attendees had to work their way around the room to fill out their card with the names of the Rotarians who matched each square.

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Prior to the event, attendees completed a survey with questions such as:

  • What is something about yourself that’s unique and people might not know about you?
  • Where were you born?
  • Who were your Rotary Sponsors?
  • What high school activity, club, or sport did you participated in?
  • What unique event have you attended?
  • Have you ever done a unique Rotary make-up international or domestic?

Attendees learned that some of their fellow Downtown Rotarian’s have:

  • Been a ski bum for a winter
  • Spent two months deep in the Amazon jungle
  • Attended a cocktail party on Malcolm Forbes yacht
  • Did a Rotary make-up on Easter Island

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Autumn Hike at Louis’ Bluff on October 18, 2014

–submitted by Katie Ryan; photos by Herman Baumann, Karl Gutknecht & Susan Hunt

Group Photo

On Saturday, October 18, the Rotary Special Events Fellowship Group, Hiking Fellowship Group and Big Wheels Bicycling Fellowship Group and guests were invited to Frank and Mariana Weinhold’s beautiful 135-acre property, Louis’ Bluff.  The farm was settled in 1847 and is one of the oldest in Juneau County. It includes 7000 feet of shoreline along the Wisconsin River and a spectacular rocky bluff that provides an incredible view.  The October 8 Rotary speaker photojournalist Mike Kienitz went out to the site, which is about an hour and a quarter’s drive from Madison on the north side of the Wisconsin Dells, and captured the panorama with his camera-fitted drone.

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You can watch his October 11, 2014,  at the you tube video “DRONE IN THE DELLS“. Our hike was on the same sort of glorious, sunny fall day.

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We gathered at the Weinhold’s house for a barbecue lunch and social time before heading out on hikes.  There are flat routes past cultivated fields and through the oak and pine woods to the beaches and a steep climb up the rocky limestone bluffs.  Most of the group of thirty headed up to the top.  There’s an overlook to the north that juts out into the Wisconsin River and provides a stunning view of the formations caused by glacial outwash. The entire property is a private conservation area, and although you see some evidence of civilization, you’d never guess you were down the road from the amusements of the Dells. There is a reminder of the tourism history however, a 1954 cedar-log replica of the Fort Winnebago blockhouse from the Fort Dells amusement park relocated at Louis’ Bluff. It was dedicated in a traditional Ho-Chunk ceremony and there are headdresses from the Bear Clan on display inside.

Native Am flute_ N overlookBesides geological interest, the entire area is sacred to the Ho-Chunk nation.  Melanie Tallmadge Sainz (left), a member of the Ho-Chunk nation whose family has a long history at the site, accompanied the hikers.  At the top she explained the Native American significance of the area and played a beautiful melody on a cedar flute.  She is director of the Little Eagle Arts Foundation.   Another special viewing was an active eagle’s nest on the Weinhold’s bluff. The group reconvened at the house for pie and ice cream.  The Weinholds opened their house, ice house, shed, beach-side gazebo and a cemetery for exploration.  It was a spectacular fall day and a great excursion for the Rotary hiking fellowship.

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Our thanks to Frank and Mariana Weinhold for their gracious hospitality and to Petie Rudy and Leigh Richardson of the Special Events Fellowship Group for organizing this event.