Governor Tony Evers — At the Heart of It

submitted by Ellie Schatz; photo by Mike Engelberger

Gov Tony Evers 5 1 19Being a past Rotarian when he was a private citizen, Governor Tony Evers opened with some personal observations. First, he applauded the audience for their civic mindedness and stressed the importance we play as role models for our young people. Second, he talked about the small private liabilities of being in a major public position. For instance, he asked how do you sell a car? It took him and his wife over a month to figure that out. In summary of his private life, he said, “I try to figure it out; not worry; keep steady.”

The Governor focused on questions of the budget in his formal presentation. His budget/funding goals include:

  1. The Transportation System. Wisconsin ranks low, somewhere between #48 and #50. Transportation issues include biking, walking, and mass transit.

 

  1. Health Care. He has a plan to infuse 1.6 million dollars to invest in, among other things, good baby and mom care, opioid treatment, and the health of children suffering from lead poisoning. As an aside he mentioned that frustrations include answering questions such as, “why spend all that money on those kids” (who are eating lead paint from their walls)?!

 

  1. Education, which is underfunded to the point of threatening the stature of the UW-Madison. Frustrations here include having to explain why professors are an important resource and why kids with disabilities or who speak English as a second language deserve a financial commitment.

 

  1. Criminal Justice Reform. Wisconsin has too many people sentenced to prison for non-violent crimes. We need urban area programs to help them rather than focusing on sentencing.

 

Some of these issues were elaborated during the Q & A. For instance, regarding education he was asked about in-state tuition for dreamers. He replied, “I think we’ll win that argument…. In-state tuition (and driver’s permits) are important – a no brainer.”

When asked about steps to stop abuses of minorities in school and housing, he emphasized the importance of conversations at the local and state levels. As he visited schools and communities in the past two weeks, he asked personnel and students if they thought racism was worse now than ever before. The answer was an unfortunate, resounding, “Yes!” The Governor emphasizes that we must acknowledge the problem, examine what is in our hearts, look at what we can do as individuals as well as groups, and accept our civic responsibilities for making a difference.

So, Governor, you were anything but dull today. From your heart and our hearts, we acknowledge the problems and resolve to move forward with respect and good will.

If you missed our meeting this week, you can watch the video here.  Our thanks to WisconsinEye for videotaping our meeting this week.

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