Tag Archives: Madison Rotary Foundation

Annual Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Program on May 27, 2015

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The Madison Rotary Foundation has awarded college scholarships totaling $280,000 to 24 graduates from Madison area high schools, and we honored the students, along with their guests, at our May 27 luncheon.

Students who received these scholarships are listed below by donor scholarship fund:

Nathan F. Brand Scholar: Riley Boyce
Frederic S. Brandenberg Scholar: Jariah James
Harry L. French Scholars: Sophia Chadli, Andrew Jiang, Kristjana Hrovat & Drake Singleton
Dick Goldberg Scholar: Alyssa Ivy
Perry & Virginia Henderson Scholar: Michael Brown
Louis Hirsig Scholar: Oliva Combs
Thomas Leonard Scholar: Kaleb Beining
Irving & Dorothy Levy Family Scholars: Brandon Alvarez-Carrera, Aminata Bojang, Katherine Casey, Elizabeth Doty, Lena Lee, Susan Mwai, Joshua Phillips & Paige Talerico
Andrew A. McBeath Scholars: Olive Earley & Andrea Zavala
Regina M. Millner Scholar: Lucy Ji
Synergy Scholar: Taylor Westfall-McCoy
Worzala Family Scholar: Tenzin Kunsel
Wilson Two-Year Scholar: Deaven Carney Wiedmer

Our Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Committee annually selects students from each high school in accordance with the wishes of the donors.  The chosen applicants are students with high academic standing and with character and leadership ability who have made contributions to their schools and communities and have financial need.

This year’s group of scholars had the benefit of hearing from a past recipient, Kristy Juno, who received Frederic Brandenburg scholarship in 2009.

The Rotary Club of Madison and the Madison Rotary Foundation wish to thank the members of the Scholarship Committee for their hard work in selecting this year’s recipients: Bob Shumaker (chair), Donna Hurd, Robyn Kitson, Oscar Mireles, Tom Popp, Ellie Schatz, Wes Sparkman, and Cheryl Weston.  We also thank Rotarians who will be serving as mentors to these scholars during their upcoming college years.

We appreciate the efforts of our photographer John Bonsett-Veal who provided us with a group photo of this year’s recipients.

As always, the awards program is a motivation for all Rotarians to provide financial resources for the Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Program.

Our congratulations to the 24 students receiving this year’s scholarships and best wishes for success in their college careers!

Rotary Scholars Attended Winter Mixer and Rotary Luncheon on January 7

–submitted by Ellie Schatz; photos by Jeff Smith

From left: Scholars Brett Stratton, Hloua Vang

From left: Scholars Brett Stratton, Gregorio Abrajan & Hloua Vang

UW System President Ray Cross addressed our club on Wednesday, January 7, with our need as a state to capitalize on the talents of our youth for leadership and security in the future obviously a theme of his talk. And, sitting in his audience were 25-30 Rotary Scholars, freshmen through seniors, the epitome of why we should have hope, if only we put our resources and attentions in the right place. Politics aside, Rotary does just that.

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Photo 1: Ted Ballweg & Scholar Hloua Vang; Photo 2: Roth Judd & Scholar Aria Guglielmina; Photo 3: From left: Scholar Victoria Cooper, Maggie Peterman, Nancy Young & Brett Stratton

Before we even got to lunch and that talk, more than 50 people with diverse backgrounds, goals, and professions spent an hour talking, laughing, and connecting. We learned silly things such as the fact that Dick Lovell (still) eats oatmeal for breakfast and Melanie Ramey knows Japanese but don’t ask her to tutor you in it. On the more serious side we learned about dreams— Brett Stratton intends to learn Portuguese; and accomplishments—Karen Bauer is a McNair Fellow headed for study abroad in Ecuador this coming Monday.

Scholars Karen Bauer & Cristhian Hernandez

Scholars Karen Bauer & Cristhian Hernandez

In addition to talk time, two important announcements were made: 1) Juniors and seniors can apply for the Kay Scholarship, new in 2015, if they have need for a boost beyond their 8-semester scholarship support, and 2) A new database is being launched to help match any of them with internships and job opportunities as they move toward their goals of graduation and realizing their dreams, big and little.

Thank you to all our mentors and scholarship donors who are helping these scholars succeed. It is an inspiration to talk with so many of them every January and feel the power and goodwill that fills that room.

 

Our Club Distributed $24,350 in Youth Awards and $240,000 in College Scholarships to Local High School Students in May 2014

2014 Youth Awards

45th Annual Rotary Youth Awards Program on May 14, 2014

On May 14, the Rotary Club of Madison honored 46 Madison high school students who received Rotary certificates and cash awards totaling $24,350 to recognize their scholastic achievements and contributions to the Madison community.  Awards were made in the following categories:

The $600 Rotary Senior Academic Achievement Awards for top scholarship were presented to Katie Alley from Memorial High School; Emmett Geisler from La Follette High School; Catherine Paulson from West High School; Megan Schomaker from Edgewood High School;  and Cora Wiese Moore fromEast High School.

Receiving $1,400 awards for their participation in Community Service Projects were Teresa Baymon from East High School; Adrian Conner from East High School; Alyssa Diaczun from Memorial High School; Desirae Fisher from East High School; Benjamin Gellman from Memorial High School; and Mathias Lemos Castillo at West High School.

Six sophomores receive the 12th annual $200 Wilson Sophomore Academic Improvement Awards for outstanding improvement in academic progress while in high school: Justin Collins from West High School; Sonam Dolma from Memorial High School; Shalita Hood from Shabazz City High School; Dakotah Kane from Edgewood High School; Ryan Lee from East High School; and Steven Mey from La Follette High School.

Junior Academic Improvement Awards were given to the following students in the amount of $200: Jamaine Butler from Memorial High School; Jack L’Heureux from Edgewood High School; Cortez McCree from La Follette High School; Arely Olguin from East High School; Noah Oswald from Shabazz City High School; and Era Zeka  from West High School.

Six students received $400 awards for Senior Academic Improvement while in high school: Sheniqua Bumpers from West High School; Nathan Graham from East High School; Dominic Hillestad from Shabazz City High School; Nicholas Kanoff from Edgewood High School; Tatiana Segura from La Follette High School; and Jonathan Tapia-Carrillo from Memorial High School

Samuel Shovers from Memorial High School received the $500 Fay J. Meade Community Service Award for use in furthering his education.

Five students received Outstanding Senior Awards for academic achievement, leadership and community service: Jeremy Gartland from Memorial High School; Nathaniel Graham from Edgewood High School; Shoshaunah Jacob from West High School; Khaleah Monger from La Follette High School; and Isabella Newman from East High School.

For their role in the selection process, the following students received $130 University Book Store gift certificates and were honored for serving as Community Service Award Judges: Abbigail Cotter from La Follette High School; Anna Fallon from Edgewood High School; Connor Gregorich-Trevor from Memorial High School; Raphaella Hurd from West High School; and Brennan Murphy from East High School.

Five students were selected to attend the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards Conference, and their $200 participation cost was provided by our Madison Rotary Foundation: Ari Davis from West High School; Henry Gaylord from East High School; Julia LaBonte from Edgewood High School; Naomi Makesa from Memorial High School; and Robin Mwai from La Follette High School.

Congratulations to each of these students, and we wish them well in all their future endeavors!

Our thanks to Youth Awards Committee Chair Scott Strong and the following program presenters: Moses Altsech, Richard Entenmann, Kathryne McGowan, Elaine Mischler, Stacy Nemeth, Katie Ryan, Jessica Schock, Tim Stadelman and Nancy Young.   We also thank John Bonsett-Veal for serving as photographer.

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Annual Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Program

The Madison Rotary Foundation has awarded college scholarships totaling $240,000 to 23 graduates from Madison area high schools, and we honored the students, along with their guests, at our May 28 luncheon.

Students who received these scholarships are listed by donor:

Nathan F. Brand Scholar: Austin Coppernoll
Frederic Brandenberg Scholar: Shamell Long-Homesly
Harry L. French Scholars: Gregorio Abrajan, Victoria Cooper, Laura Her, Lilian Kenitz, Hloua Vang
Perry & Virginia Henderson Scholar: Eleazar Wawa
Louis Hirsig Scholar: Samuel Park
Thomas Leonard Scholar: Ayla Hammill
Irving & Dorothy Levy Family Scholars: Iffat Bhuiyan, McKenna Crossen, Anna Grassy, Irene Katana, Mathias Lemos Castillo, Jo-Nathan Wesley, Shaneice White
Andrew McBeath Scholars: Tenzin Chonzin, Marie Nofodji
Regina M. Millner Scholar: Brett Stratton
Synergy Scholar: Gabriel Gugielmina
Mike & Patty Wilson Scholar: Dale Blassingame
Worzala Family Scholar: Caroline Liu

Our Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Committee annually selects students from each high school in accordance with the wishes of the donors.  The chosen applicants are students with high academic standing and with character and leadership ability who have made contributions to their schools and communities and have financial need.

DSC_0001This year’s group of scholars had the benefit of hearing from a past recipient, Amadou Fofana (pictured at left), who received an Andrew McBeath scholarship in 2008.

The Rotary Club of Madison and the Madison Rotary Foundation wish to thank the members of the Scholarship Committee for their hard work in selecting this year’s recipients: Bob Shumaker (chair), Robyn Kitson, Regina Millner, Tom Popp,Ellie Schatz, Wes Sparkman, Cheryl Weston and David Worzala.  We also thank Rotarians who will be serving as mentors to these scholars during their upcoming college years.

We appreciate the efforts of our photographer John Bonsett-Veal who provided us with a group photo of this year’s recipients.

As always, the awards program is a motivation for all Rotarians to provide financial resources for the Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Program.

Our congratulations to the 23 students receiving this year’s scholarships and best wishes for success in their college careers!

 

Mentor Scholar Mixer Highlights

–submitted by Mary Rouse; Photos by John Bonsett-Veal and Stacy Nemeth

IMG_0207All Rotary Scholars and their mentors were invited to get together prior to the January 8, 2014, Rotary meeting. It is an annual event sponsored by our Club. Mentor Leader Ellie Schatz convened the 11AM meeting.  Twenty-five Scholars and 20 mentors attended this event which opened with a mixer bingo quiz for both groups to provide more opportunities for the students and Rotarians to meet and get to know each other.  Prizes were awarded to the top finishers.

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Photo 1: Lynn Phelps and Juan Becerra; Photo 2: Cristian Claudio Teutli; Photo 3: Wes Sparkman and Melanie Ramey; Photo 4: Karen Bauer and Mike Wilson

Ellie continued the discussion by posing several questions to the entire group for reflections and anecdotes about their experiences, talents and interests. Here are two examples: Scholar Cristian Claudio Teutli  plays the drums and sings.  At the request of group members, he provided spontaneous entertainment by drumming on the table and by singing a song a capella in Spanish.  Another student, Karen Bauer attends UW-Eau Claire and has recently assumed the presidency of an interfaith student organization. 

IMG_0208Dick Lovell  (pictured at left with scholar Karen Bauer) outlined the Rotary Internship Matching Program and encouraged the students to register by January 31, 2014, if they are seeking internships for the summer of 2014.   He also encouraged them to sign up on the Rotary Scholar Mentor Facebook page.

Bob Shumaker, current chair of the Scholarship Committee, presented and narrated a video which was just made about the Mentor Program in 2013.

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Photo 1: Marcy Martinez and Leslie Grendahl; Photo 2: Karl Gutknecht, Nate Brand and Juan Becerra; Photo 3: (back row, from left) Cristian Claudio Teuli, Alex Carrera and Lynn Phelps, (front row, from left): Mike Wilson, Cristian Claudio Teutli, Jordan Johnson and Patty Wilson

The recurring theme of the meeting was how much the Rotary Scholars are valued by our Club members with a focus of making sure they have all the support they need to ensure their graduation.  The meeting adjourned to the weekly Rotary Club luncheon where, once again, the Scholars were welcomed and their graduation from college expected.

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Photo 1: Kody Parman and Dean Nelson; Photo 2: Jordan Johnson and Patty Wilson; Photo 3: Roth Judd and Carlos Solano

Celebrating 100 Years: A Look Back in Our Club’s History on Ethics Symposium

Rotary Club of Madison-Centennial LogoOur History Sub-Committee continues to take a look back in our club’s rich history and is sharing highlights from the past century.  This week’s message is shared by committee member Jerry Thain:

Ethics LogoEthics Symposium Became One of Club’s Signature Events in the 21st Century

The earlier centennial blog posts dealt primarily with events of the Club in its first 75 years. While such “look backs” provide perspective for today, one of the Club’s major events was developed within the last 15 years and remains an ongoing cornerstone of Club outreach. What is now the annual Rotary Ethics Symposium for high school juniors in Dane County was developed by Melanie Ramey and other Club members beginning in 1999. The first such event was held in October 2000, and there has been one every academic year since then. The first ones were held in October, and the Symposium was held on days when meetings of teachers provided a non-school day for the Symposium. Notably, the schools soon recognized the academic value of the program and allowed students to attend it in lieu of school so the Rotary Ethics Symposium in recent years has been held in February or March. The first program was at the Concourse Hotel; lately the Monona Terrace Convention Center has been the venue.

Ethan Ecklund-ParaThe Rotary Ethics Symposium has been constantly evolving and continues to evolve in its particulars even today. However, it has always involved intensive looks at specific ethical problems by the students and a great deal of preparation and participation by a large number of Rotarians, a few of whom have been involved in every program held to date. Instead of an opening address by a noted scholar or professional specializing in ethics, which was the pattern in the first years, the Symposium now begins with the staging of an ethical problem pertinent to high school students by the First Wave Drama & Music group of the UW-Madison followed by discussion of that and then, as always, breakout sessions of the students into smaller groups that each deal with an ethical issue before returning to a plenary lunch and opportunity for feedback.

DSC00257The Rotary Ethics Symposium, acting in conjunction with academic specialists in ethics such as the Santa Clara University Center for Ethical Studies, developed an R.O.T.A.R.Y. framework for studying ethical dilemmas and five widely utilized but differing approaches to decide them. The emphasis has always been on advising students that there often is no single “right” answer to an ethical question and that different approaches may yield different results, even though both or all may be considered an ethical solution to the problem.

The R.O.T.A.R.Y. framework, in brief, is as follows: Recognize an ethical issue; Obtain pertinent information; Test alternative approaches from the various ethical perspectives; Act consistently with your best judgment; Reflect on your decision; Yield to your ethical judgments.

The Rotary Ethics Symposium now involves not only the volunteer activities of many Club members but also of non-members engaged in analysis of ethical problems in business and the professions, as well as Rotaract participants. Although it seems certain that fine-tuning will continue each year in an effort to continue to improve the program, it clearly has been a success from the perspectives of both students and Rotarians since its inception. Consider the reports in Club newsletters about the initial ethics symposium in 2000 and about the most recent one on March 1, 2013, attended by 213 students from 19 Dane County high schools.

There is every reason to believe that the Symposium will be a signal activity of the Club in its second century of “service above self.”

Celebrating 100 Years: A Look Back in Our Club’s History During the Progressive Era

Rotary Club of Madison-Centennial LogoAs we celebrate our 100th anniversary, our History Sub-Committee is taking a look back in our club’s rich history and is sharing highlights from the past century.  This week’s message is shared by committee member Rich Leffler:

The Rotary Club of Chicago was founded in February 1905. The Rotary Club of Madison began in 1913. Both were products of the Progressive Era, a period marked by a terrible depression and war. Huge corporations and trusts came into existence. It was a time of brutal competition among businesses and business people. Labor and capital were locked in violent, bloody conflict. It saw an ever-increasing and rapid change from rural to urban America, the growth of cities in not-so-wholesome ways, leading to terrible living- and working conditions. It was also a time when people were searching for ways to control and channel all of these developments. Progressivism, which sought to use government to control these forces of change, and the Social Gospel, which sought to modify economic life and social conditions with the gentle influence of Christianity, had an important effect on Rotary.

The Social Gospel was “Built on the premise that social justice and Christianity were synonymous,” and it “emphasized the humanity of Christ, especially his concern for the poor and the destitute.” Advocates of the Social Gospel “called for major social reforms to achieve a more equitable, a more Christian society.”1

rosenberry 3An Address given by Madison Rotarian and Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Marvin B. Rosenberry (left) in 1917, “The Spirit of Rotary in Business,” demonstrates the powerful effect of combining the Social Gospel with the imperative of Service, and it explains what Paul Harris meant when he said “Rotary’s supreme purpose is to serve.”2

You will notice in the Address that Justice Rosenberry was not a supporter of service by checkbook, which is the predominant way of service for our club today. But in 1922 he became one of the founders of that quintessential checkbook service, what is today the United Way of Dane County, and he was the first chair. The size of our Foundation at $8.5 million, our annual fund raising at $130,000, and our annual giving at $500,000 suggest that service, always important to our club, has become a passion. I think Justice Rosenberry would approve.
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1. Lewis L. Gould, “Introduction,” The Progressive Era (Syracuse, 1974), p. 13.
2. Paul P. Harris, My Road to Rotary: The Story of a Boy, A Vermont Community and Rotary (Chicago, 1948), p. 253. I should also point out that while Justice Rosenberry’s ideas were obviously informed by the Social Gospel, he was not a Progressive. Actually, he was a “Stalwart” Republican, strongly opposed to the La Follette Progressive Republicans. In fact, La Follette referred to Rosenberry as “a rank reactionary,” which is clearly not true. See Ann Walsh Bradley, “Marvin B. Rosenberry: Unparalleled Breadth of Service,” Wisconsin Lawyer 76 (October 2003), online edition