Tag Archives: Youth

Our Club Distributed $24,350 in Youth Awards and $240,000 in College Scholarships to Local High School Students in May 2014

2014 Youth Awards

45th Annual Rotary Youth Awards Program on May 14, 2014

On May 14, the Rotary Club of Madison honored 46 Madison high school students who received Rotary certificates and cash awards totaling $24,350 to recognize their scholastic achievements and contributions to the Madison community.  Awards were made in the following categories:

The $600 Rotary Senior Academic Achievement Awards for top scholarship were presented to Katie Alley from Memorial High School; Emmett Geisler from La Follette High School; Catherine Paulson from West High School; Megan Schomaker from Edgewood High School;  and Cora Wiese Moore fromEast High School.

Receiving $1,400 awards for their participation in Community Service Projects were Teresa Baymon from East High School; Adrian Conner from East High School; Alyssa Diaczun from Memorial High School; Desirae Fisher from East High School; Benjamin Gellman from Memorial High School; and Mathias Lemos Castillo at West High School.

Six sophomores receive the 12th annual $200 Wilson Sophomore Academic Improvement Awards for outstanding improvement in academic progress while in high school: Justin Collins from West High School; Sonam Dolma from Memorial High School; Shalita Hood from Shabazz City High School; Dakotah Kane from Edgewood High School; Ryan Lee from East High School; and Steven Mey from La Follette High School.

Junior Academic Improvement Awards were given to the following students in the amount of $200: Jamaine Butler from Memorial High School; Jack L’Heureux from Edgewood High School; Cortez McCree from La Follette High School; Arely Olguin from East High School; Noah Oswald from Shabazz City High School; and Era Zeka  from West High School.

Six students received $400 awards for Senior Academic Improvement while in high school: Sheniqua Bumpers from West High School; Nathan Graham from East High School; Dominic Hillestad from Shabazz City High School; Nicholas Kanoff from Edgewood High School; Tatiana Segura from La Follette High School; and Jonathan Tapia-Carrillo from Memorial High School

Samuel Shovers from Memorial High School received the $500 Fay J. Meade Community Service Award for use in furthering his education.

Five students received Outstanding Senior Awards for academic achievement, leadership and community service: Jeremy Gartland from Memorial High School; Nathaniel Graham from Edgewood High School; Shoshaunah Jacob from West High School; Khaleah Monger from La Follette High School; and Isabella Newman from East High School.

For their role in the selection process, the following students received $130 University Book Store gift certificates and were honored for serving as Community Service Award Judges: Abbigail Cotter from La Follette High School; Anna Fallon from Edgewood High School; Connor Gregorich-Trevor from Memorial High School; Raphaella Hurd from West High School; and Brennan Murphy from East High School.

Five students were selected to attend the Rotary Youth Leadership Awards Conference, and their $200 participation cost was provided by our Madison Rotary Foundation: Ari Davis from West High School; Henry Gaylord from East High School; Julia LaBonte from Edgewood High School; Naomi Makesa from Memorial High School; and Robin Mwai from La Follette High School.

Congratulations to each of these students, and we wish them well in all their future endeavors!

Our thanks to Youth Awards Committee Chair Scott Strong and the following program presenters: Moses Altsech, Richard Entenmann, Kathryne McGowan, Elaine Mischler, Stacy Nemeth, Katie Ryan, Jessica Schock, Tim Stadelman and Nancy Young.   We also thank John Bonsett-Veal for serving as photographer.

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Annual Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Program

The Madison Rotary Foundation has awarded college scholarships totaling $240,000 to 23 graduates from Madison area high schools, and we honored the students, along with their guests, at our May 28 luncheon.

Students who received these scholarships are listed by donor:

Nathan F. Brand Scholar: Austin Coppernoll
Frederic Brandenberg Scholar: Shamell Long-Homesly
Harry L. French Scholars: Gregorio Abrajan, Victoria Cooper, Laura Her, Lilian Kenitz, Hloua Vang
Perry & Virginia Henderson Scholar: Eleazar Wawa
Louis Hirsig Scholar: Samuel Park
Thomas Leonard Scholar: Ayla Hammill
Irving & Dorothy Levy Family Scholars: Iffat Bhuiyan, McKenna Crossen, Anna Grassy, Irene Katana, Mathias Lemos Castillo, Jo-Nathan Wesley, Shaneice White
Andrew McBeath Scholars: Tenzin Chonzin, Marie Nofodji
Regina M. Millner Scholar: Brett Stratton
Synergy Scholar: Gabriel Gugielmina
Mike & Patty Wilson Scholar: Dale Blassingame
Worzala Family Scholar: Caroline Liu

Our Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Committee annually selects students from each high school in accordance with the wishes of the donors.  The chosen applicants are students with high academic standing and with character and leadership ability who have made contributions to their schools and communities and have financial need.

DSC_0001This year’s group of scholars had the benefit of hearing from a past recipient, Amadou Fofana (pictured at left), who received an Andrew McBeath scholarship in 2008.

The Rotary Club of Madison and the Madison Rotary Foundation wish to thank the members of the Scholarship Committee for their hard work in selecting this year’s recipients: Bob Shumaker (chair), Robyn Kitson, Regina Millner, Tom Popp,Ellie Schatz, Wes Sparkman, Cheryl Weston and David Worzala.  We also thank Rotarians who will be serving as mentors to these scholars during their upcoming college years.

We appreciate the efforts of our photographer John Bonsett-Veal who provided us with a group photo of this year’s recipients.

As always, the awards program is a motivation for all Rotarians to provide financial resources for the Madison Rotary Foundation Scholarship Program.

Our congratulations to the 23 students receiving this year’s scholarships and best wishes for success in their college careers!

 

Mentor Scholar Mixer Highlights

–submitted by Mary Rouse; Photos by John Bonsett-Veal and Stacy Nemeth

IMG_0207All Rotary Scholars and their mentors were invited to get together prior to the January 8, 2014, Rotary meeting. It is an annual event sponsored by our Club. Mentor Leader Ellie Schatz convened the 11AM meeting.  Twenty-five Scholars and 20 mentors attended this event which opened with a mixer bingo quiz for both groups to provide more opportunities for the students and Rotarians to meet and get to know each other.  Prizes were awarded to the top finishers.

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Photo 1: Lynn Phelps and Juan Becerra; Photo 2: Cristian Claudio Teutli; Photo 3: Wes Sparkman and Melanie Ramey; Photo 4: Karen Bauer and Mike Wilson

Ellie continued the discussion by posing several questions to the entire group for reflections and anecdotes about their experiences, talents and interests. Here are two examples: Scholar Cristian Claudio Teutli  plays the drums and sings.  At the request of group members, he provided spontaneous entertainment by drumming on the table and by singing a song a capella in Spanish.  Another student, Karen Bauer attends UW-Eau Claire and has recently assumed the presidency of an interfaith student organization. 

IMG_0208Dick Lovell  (pictured at left with scholar Karen Bauer) outlined the Rotary Internship Matching Program and encouraged the students to register by January 31, 2014, if they are seeking internships for the summer of 2014.   He also encouraged them to sign up on the Rotary Scholar Mentor Facebook page.

Bob Shumaker, current chair of the Scholarship Committee, presented and narrated a video which was just made about the Mentor Program in 2013.

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Photo 1: Marcy Martinez and Leslie Grendahl; Photo 2: Karl Gutknecht, Nate Brand and Juan Becerra; Photo 3: (back row, from left) Cristian Claudio Teuli, Alex Carrera and Lynn Phelps, (front row, from left): Mike Wilson, Cristian Claudio Teutli, Jordan Johnson and Patty Wilson

The recurring theme of the meeting was how much the Rotary Scholars are valued by our Club members with a focus of making sure they have all the support they need to ensure their graduation.  The meeting adjourned to the weekly Rotary Club luncheon where, once again, the Scholars were welcomed and their graduation from college expected.

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Photo 1: Kody Parman and Dean Nelson; Photo 2: Jordan Johnson and Patty Wilson; Photo 3: Roth Judd and Carlos Solano

Celebrating 100 Years: A Look Back in Our Club’s History on Ethics Symposium

Rotary Club of Madison-Centennial LogoOur History Sub-Committee continues to take a look back in our club’s rich history and is sharing highlights from the past century.  This week’s message is shared by committee member Jerry Thain:

Ethics LogoEthics Symposium Became One of Club’s Signature Events in the 21st Century

The earlier centennial blog posts dealt primarily with events of the Club in its first 75 years. While such “look backs” provide perspective for today, one of the Club’s major events was developed within the last 15 years and remains an ongoing cornerstone of Club outreach. What is now the annual Rotary Ethics Symposium for high school juniors in Dane County was developed by Melanie Ramey and other Club members beginning in 1999. The first such event was held in October 2000, and there has been one every academic year since then. The first ones were held in October, and the Symposium was held on days when meetings of teachers provided a non-school day for the Symposium. Notably, the schools soon recognized the academic value of the program and allowed students to attend it in lieu of school so the Rotary Ethics Symposium in recent years has been held in February or March. The first program was at the Concourse Hotel; lately the Monona Terrace Convention Center has been the venue.

Ethan Ecklund-ParaThe Rotary Ethics Symposium has been constantly evolving and continues to evolve in its particulars even today. However, it has always involved intensive looks at specific ethical problems by the students and a great deal of preparation and participation by a large number of Rotarians, a few of whom have been involved in every program held to date. Instead of an opening address by a noted scholar or professional specializing in ethics, which was the pattern in the first years, the Symposium now begins with the staging of an ethical problem pertinent to high school students by the First Wave Drama & Music group of the UW-Madison followed by discussion of that and then, as always, breakout sessions of the students into smaller groups that each deal with an ethical issue before returning to a plenary lunch and opportunity for feedback.

DSC00257The Rotary Ethics Symposium, acting in conjunction with academic specialists in ethics such as the Santa Clara University Center for Ethical Studies, developed an R.O.T.A.R.Y. framework for studying ethical dilemmas and five widely utilized but differing approaches to decide them. The emphasis has always been on advising students that there often is no single “right” answer to an ethical question and that different approaches may yield different results, even though both or all may be considered an ethical solution to the problem.

The R.O.T.A.R.Y. framework, in brief, is as follows: Recognize an ethical issue; Obtain pertinent information; Test alternative approaches from the various ethical perspectives; Act consistently with your best judgment; Reflect on your decision; Yield to your ethical judgments.

The Rotary Ethics Symposium now involves not only the volunteer activities of many Club members but also of non-members engaged in analysis of ethical problems in business and the professions, as well as Rotaract participants. Although it seems certain that fine-tuning will continue each year in an effort to continue to improve the program, it clearly has been a success from the perspectives of both students and Rotarians since its inception. Consider the reports in Club newsletters about the initial ethics symposium in 2000 and about the most recent one on March 1, 2013, attended by 213 students from 19 Dane County high schools.

There is every reason to believe that the Symposium will be a signal activity of the Club in its second century of “service above self.”

100 Avenues of Service Project Off to a Great Start!

–submitted by Neil Fauerbach,  100 Avenues of Service Sub-Committee Chair

   Your Rotary Club of Madison has had a tremendous impact on our community and the world.  It is one of the reasons we are Rotarians–to make the world a better place, one small step at a time.
   As we mark our 100th year as a Rotary Club, we have many events, projects and celebrations to mark this milestone. One of the projects the Centennial Celebration Committee has planned is called “100 Avenues of Service.” This project will keep track of, count and document the projects that Rotarians carry out between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013.  The idea is not to be boastful but to illustrate to our members and prospective members the value of being a Rotarian.
   What is a “Project”?   Sticking with the Strategic Priority, the projects should fall into one of our five avenues of service: Club, Community, Vocational, New Generations and International.  All Committees and Fellowship Groups will be asked to communicate their projects for documentation.
   Projects such as Polio Plus or the annual Ethics Symposium–even though they have multiple “touches” or meetings throughout the year–are considered ONE project.  A fundraiser by the Wine Fellowship Group to benefit a Rotaract project is ONE project.
   The 100 Avenue Projects will be communicated in a number of ways, as we all receive our information through different channels.  Projects will be recorded on our blog, tweeted, reported on our website, documented in our club newsletter and occasionally reported from the podium. The goal is to increase our activities in our Centennial year, document those activities and show the true impact our activities have on our community.
   When one gives of their time, their money and themselves, it not only helps others but also strengthens our own spirit. Some of the happiest people we know are the busy volunteers in our midst.
   This year we will show 100 more reasons we are proud to be Rotarians!  We are off to a good start with the following:

Pete Christianson

#1 – The Community Projects Committee organized the 3rd Annual Rotary Blood Drive held on July 11 around our weekly meeting. Twenty pints were collected from Red-Blooded Rotarians. (It was falsely reported that the Rotary Scholars/Mentors picnic was the first. Sorry, Ellie!)

Ellie Schatz (second from right) pictured with 3 of her mentees.

#2 – Rotary Scholar/Mentor Picnic was held on July 15th at the home of Nate Brand and Regina Millner. Twenty-five scholars and their mentors were served a cookout feast by the Kitchen Committee.

#3 – On July 21, the Bicycle Fellowship Group helped the Boys & Girls Club of Dane County in their annual bike ride to raise money for their great programs. The ride raised over $300,000 for the club.

Highlights from 6th Annual Rotary Mentor-Scholar Picnic

–submitted by Stu Levitan

About 25 Rotary scholars and their respective club mentors enjoyed themselves at the now-traditional summer picnic at Nate Brand and Regina Millner’s beautiful Fuller’s Woods home on July 15. The kitchen crew of Kevin Hoffman, Mike Hoesly and Jim Ruhly, led by co-chair Gary Peterson braved the sweltering heat to staff the grill, as members supplemented the menu with salads, sides and desserts. Admiral Dick Pearson, who with Noel, hosted the first two Mentor-Scholar picnics, took several groups on tours of mighty Lake Mendota in his deck boat.  A fine time was had by all.

 

 Following are quotes from those attending the picnic:

“Ismat and I had a great time seeing scholars from last year and welcoming new scholars. The food, fellowship, boat ride and hospitality (thanks Nate and Regina) were wonderful! It was good to connect with a couple scholars who were having challenges during their freshman year away from the Midwest. This event allows for both celebration and problem solving.”  —Deb Raupp 

“The beauty of the lake and the gracious hospitality of Regina and Nate provided the perfect setting to celebrate and share with some absolutely amazing young adults! As I left I told my husband, this is another reason why I am grateful to be a Rotarian!”  —Lin Grace Rohr 

“We had a super GREAT time at the picnic and we felt it was the best ever. Leslie loved the opportunity to get to know the other students and she loved the food, the BOAT RIDE and the beautiful home of Regina and Nate!!!! Sharyl loved the opportunity to connect with the other students and other Rotarians as we don’t often have a chance to relax and chat at Wed lunch meetings. Sharyl REALLY loved the food, it all seemed extra yummy this year and special thanks to the “grill guys” who grilled to perfection on such a hot day!! Best, Sharyl Kato

                                                                

Rotary District 6250 Annual Conference

Rotary District 6250 Annual Conference, June 8th & 9th in LaCrosse, WI

June 13, 2012 //
Submitted by Jacqui Sakowski
 
When I accepted President Paul’s invitation to car-pool to LaCrosse the environmentalist in me leapt at the chance.  I learned so much about Paul’s life – his family, his aspirations for the future, his perspective on Rotary as he approaches the passing of the pin. What a bonus!

We arrived for the Business Meeting where we got to vote on the budget and other operational issues, before attending a very fun and inspiring lunch. We were addressed by a remarkable woman – Rotary International’s first female corporate officer and cancer sufferer, who was clearly in poor health, but spoke with confidence, energy and passion about the origins of the Four Way Test.  She was to address us 4 more times before the conference ended. A display of resilience that we were all proud to witness!

Afternoon presentations on The Holocaust, the plight of children around the world and programs that help youth adopt and live by life-enhancing values made for a very informative and fast-paced afternoon. Inbound RYE students shared cultural insights about their country before supper. Our first Oktoberfest in June, was colorful and celebratory, as you can see …

It’s June 8th it must be Oktoberfeste!

Lots of connecting and re-connecting over dinner, made for lively breakfast meetings the next morning. After you dined with a District Governor clad in leiderhosen, it’s hard to stand on ceremony ever again! We celebrated gifts to the RI Foundation, and were in awe of the impact of RI dollars, and the creativity of clubs around the district who had doubled and quadrupled funds by leveraging Rotary and non-Rotary grants to expand their reach.

Mary Kessen shares the RI Foundation update.

Jerry Mcnellis tells us why Polio is one of the gifts of his life.

Rotary Club of Madison’s Honored Hero, Nelson Cummings

At lunch on Saturday we honored Rotarian’s, selected by their own clubs as Heroes. Here Nelson Cummings is greeted by Emily, a very bright RYE student who presented him with a certificate.

The afternoon flew by with programs on wellness, Rotaract, Interact and Rotary Youth Leadership Awards – the future of Rotary and the world seems to be in great hands if the young people who addressed us are the measure.

The faces of Rotary’s future. Pauline, Charlotte and Emy.

At dinner John Hewko and Betsy Demaray spoke about the importance of documenting Rotary’s true impact in the world, before the conference concluded with the (slightly early) installation of Rob Stroud as 2012-2013 District Governor.

Rob took the pin and then the stage, from where he invited Rotarian’s to assemble in Madison on May 31st and June 1st next year to celebrate 100 years of Rotary Service and Fellowship in WI, at Monona Terrace.

Paul and I headed out of LaCrosse at about 9;15 p.m. As we compared experiences on the journey home we realized that we each had new friends, new appreciation for the works and opportunities of Rotary, and an invigorated Rotary spirit to bring to our best efforts in the coming months.  I am already excited for next year!

Rotary Ethics Symposium 2012

 

 

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High School Juniors Examined Hot Button Ethical Issues on February 17 at Rotary’s 12thAnnual Ethics Symposium

 –Submitted by Sharyn Alden

   When more than 200 students from 17 area high schools gathered at the Monona Terrace, they were part of history in the making. They were participating in Rotary’s 12th annual, nothing-quite-like ethical decision making symposium that provided interesting and compelling topics that tackled the big question, “What would you do in this situation?”

   As a volunteer at past Symposiums (PR Chair of this year’s event), I had not yet had the privilege of sitting in one of the roundtable discussions expertly guided by area leaders who had expertise in specific topics at hand. 

   Here are the 12 topics which students could select from. They had time during the morning’s event to attend three of the following sessions:

  • Ethics in Advertising led by Jim Armstrong, Advertising Executive, Good for Business
  • Ethics in Business led by Denis Collins, Professor of Business at Edgewood College
  • Ethics in Bullying/Cliques led by John Bonsett-Veal, Rotarian & 
    Optometrist, John Bonsett Veal, O.D.
  • Ethics in Dating/Friendships led by Amy Bellmore & Ting-Lan 
    MaDissertator, UW-Madison School of Education 
  • Ethics in Environment led by Paul Riehemann, Rotarian & Director, 
    Integrated Property Assessment System for WI Department of Revenue
  • Ethics in Health Care led by Bill Reay, Chief Pharmacy Officer & Senior 
    Director for Physicians Plus Insurance Corporation
  • Ethics in Social and Internet Use led by Bryan Chan, Rotarian & President of Supranet Communications
  • Ethics in News Media led by Colin Benedict, News Director for WISC-TV
  • Ethics in Politics and Political Campaigns led by Andrea Kaminski
    Executive Director for WI League of Women Voters
  • Ethics in Racial Justice led by Norman Davis, Contract Compliance  
    Officer 
    for City of Madison
  • Ethics in Sports led by Scott Campbell, Rotarian & Dean, School of 
    Graduate &  Professional Studies for Edgewood College

   I decided to sit in on Ethics in Advertising guided by discussion group leader, Jim Armstrong, founder of Good for Business.

   The hypothetical case study involved a domestic violence shelter which was hosting an annual fundraiser event to raise desperately needed funds for its shelter.  The dilemma presented was this: a sponsor with deep pockets came forward, a liquor distributor who wanted to promote a new brew while also promoting the shelter’s fundraiser. But the high school students attending this session also learned that some studies have found alcohol is linked to domestic abuse between 80-90 percent of the time and that women are more likely (about 95 percent) to be victims.

   The primary ethical question that needed to be answered was this:  Should the domestic violence shelter accept the liquor company’s sponsorship?  The students broke into small groups to discuss the situation and apply the Five Approaches to ethical decision making discussed earlier that morning during the opening welcome presentation.

   My small group of five students quickly drew the conclusion that it would be hypocritical to take the sponsorship and might in fact deter other sponsors from contributing to the event once they learned of the alcohol distributor’s sponsorship. 

   The full group discussion followed and involved about 20 students who came to nearly the same decision with the vast majority in agreement with my group.

   Interestingly, Armstrong had kept track of how all three groups (ours was the last group of the morning) had previously voted. The first group that sat in on Ethics in Advertising that day had a completely different consensus than our group. Their majority voted to take the sponsorship while the second group of the morning resulted in a more mixed vote.

   What did I learn from this?  This one group discussion on one topic might be a good example of how we all look at decision making. Clearly, there is no one way of examining a topic and coming to the same conclusion.

   The votes of the numerous teens who attended these three Ethics in Advertising sessions proved just that.

   And that alone, is a compelling reason why the Rotary Club of Madison’s annual Ethics Symposium is an excellent resource for helping future leaders better prepare for ethical decision making.

Our thanks to Sharyn Alden for working with local media to cover our event:   Wisconsin State Journal Article dated March 12, 2012

 WISCTV Neil Heinen Editorial 

Small Group Discussion About Ethics in Sports