Tag Archives: Rotarians

Our Proposed Enactment – “…subject to two or more inconsistent meanings” ??

–submitted by Paul Riehemann and Karen Kendrick-Hands

Going Green Logo

We received a reply from Rotary International on the Going Green Fellowship Group’s (GGFG) Proposed Enactment which was endorsed by the District.  It’s Blue Buidlingnot good.

The Proposed Enactment asks that Clubs and RI be able to support the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to mitigate the global warming humanitarian crisis.

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Letter to the District from RI’s Constitution and Bylaws [C&B] Committee –

2016 Council on Legislation: File 163-E.  Excerpts:

The Committee has tentatively determined that file 163-E, proposed by the Rotary Club of Madison, is duly proposed, but defective under RI Bylaws section 7.037.2:

(a) it is subject to two or more inconsistent meanings

If the RI Board agrees with the Committee’s determination as to the status of your proposed legislation, it will not be transmitted to the 2016 Council for consideration. Even if it is transmitted to the Council, a member of the Constitution and Bylaws Committee may comment at the Council that the proposed legislation has been determined to be defective.

In their review of the legislation, the Committee made the following comments:

During its review of file 163, the Committee believed that this proposed
change would be inconsistent with the constitutional documents, as it could be
considered political in nature and would be in conflict with article 13, sections
1 and 3 of the Standard Rotary Club Constitution.

You may wish to be aware that the deadline to submit amendments to proposed legislation is 31 March 2015. Please respond with any amendments to your legislation as soon as possible.

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District 6250 Reply –

With the support of many District and Club leaders, District Governor Dave Warren forwarded this REPLY.  Excerpts:

  • “It appears that the Constitution and Bylaws [C&B] Committee’s declaration of File 163-E-D to be defective was in error and contrary to Rotary International’s governance procedures.”
  • “The C&B Committee has furnished no evidence or basis for the proposal’s susceptibility to two or more inconsistent meanings.  That finding, we believe, is incorrect.
  • “To bring its decision into compliance with RI’s governance procedures and to render an action that is “Fair to All Concerned”, Rotary District 6250 urges the C&B Committee to reconsider and alter its “tentative” action on File 163-E-D to advance the District 6250’s proposal for consideration at the 2016 Council on Legislation.”
  • “District 6250’s Going Green Fellowship Group proceeded precisely as then President Elect Gary Huang advised when he spoke at the Rotary Club of Madison, saying that initiatives in Rotary “must begin with the club.”  We are deeply disappointed that the C&B Committee is considering keeping our duly proposed and endorsed enactment from reaching the 2016 Council on Legislation for their consideration.”

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RI Response –

The Committee will review and discuss your letter at their April 28-29 meeting. Based on the results of that discussion, the Committee would be able to extend the deadline for amendments, to allow your district time to address any concerns.

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We’re confident that the C&B Committee and Rotary will follow the Four-Way Test here.  We are not going to make any amendments at this time since we don’t have any feedback on the concerns raised.

Call to Action.jpg

Political?

The Proposed Enactment asks for an exception to Rotary’s non-political stance to fully empower RI and Clubs to support the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to mitigate the global warming humanitarian crisis (GWHC).  Some believe that the GWHC is not political.  Under these dictionary definitions of “political” we believe action on the GWHC is political, as is Rotary’s successful campaign to assist in the eradication of polio.

po·lit·i·cal

  1. relating to the government, the state or the public affairs
  2. of or relating to citizens
  3. having a definite policy

Additionally, some solutions will require legislation – see the Group’s Open Letter.

We’re heartened by the support of so many in District 6250 and our Club and will keep you posted.

 

Preserving Decades of Rotary Work

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September 29, 2014

An Open Letter to Rotary Club of Madison and District 6250 Members,

Working to stop the global warming humanitarian crisis by enacting a revenue-neutral carbon tax (RNCT) will help the most people and will resonate with the next generation of Rotarians. This crisis threatens to undo much of Rotary’s good work. ‘Service Above Self’ dictates that we work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and inform others. The Going Green Fellowship Group (GGFG) of the Rotary Club of Madison asks fellow Rotarians to take the time to read this letter. We do this for our children, grandchildren and future generations.

The GGFG proposes that between January 2015 and April 2016 Rotarians worldwide learn about a RNCT as a solution to the global warming humanitarian crisis. We are asking the clubs of District 6250 to approve
Proposed Enactment B which supports a RNCT, by December 15, 2014. District approval will set the stage for this critical information sharing and dialogue to occur worldwide – 1.2 million Rotarians in 34,500 clubs in over 200 countries.

CLICK To read the full Going Green Fellowship Open Letter.

Proposed Enactment B    Citations
Proposed Enactment A
Rotary International Council on Legislation – Overview of Process
Two-page Summary of Going Green Fellowship Open Letter
Video

 

Coach Andersen Addresses Rotary

–submitted by Linda Maremont; photo by Pete Christianson

From left: Club President Tim Stadelman, Coach Gary Andersen and Jason Beren

From left: Club President Tim Stadelman, Coach Gary Andersen and Jason Beren

UW Football Head Coach Gary Andersen was greeted warmly by a large audience to our August 13 meeting.  After a successful first season in 2013 (with a winning record of 9-4), Andersen and the players were thrilled to finally officially begin preparations for a season that will begin August 30 against LSU in Houston.  The team is wrapping up a 13-day stretch in which UW will practice every day.

Coach Andersen emphasized the youth of the team this season, but still intends to stay with the physical style of football for which Wisconsin is known.  Even though Andersen mentioned that he will be started more true freshmen than in previous years, he is confident that they are up for the challenge.  He believes that the biggest challenge facing them will not be the physical size difference that comes along with starting younger players but the experience in a competitive environment.  These players are lucky to be on the “good guy” side of the ball as Camp Randall has been recently ranked the most intimidating college stadium in the country by ESPN.  However when it comes time to travel to Texas to play LSU, the young players’ poise will truly be tested.  The coach spent a fair amount of time discussing how the team, more specifically the offensive and defensive lines, are developing. It is apparent that he knows what is most important and what needs to be emphasized for the Wisconsin run heavy style of play to be successful.

He has a deep love for his team that extends beyond just basic football.  Wisconsin has been and will continue to be one of the top ranked schools in terms of athlete academics.   Coach Andersen noted the team’s average GPA is nearing 3.0, which is impressive for a team at a top ranked university.  The fact that not a single player who graduated last year came back to ask for a position on Coach Andersen’s staff is a testament to how important academics are to the football program and the University as a whole.

Coach Andersen delivered an excellent speech that calmed some fears and excited the fans in the audience about the season to come.  When asked about how it feels to coach his son, Coach Andersen responded that he treats every player like his son–which earns him respect along with forming a bond of trust between him and his players.

Coach Andersen’s remarks gave testament to his passion for the game, his team and his excitement to be part of UW and Madison.  On Wisconsin!

We thank WisconsinEye for videotaping our meeting this week.  CLICK to watch the video.

Berry Tells Story of DDT Activists

–submitted by Valerie Johnson; photo by John Bonsett-Veal

Bill Berry

DDT saved lives during WWII, and still does today in some places, Rotarians heard at the July 16 meeting from Bill Berry.  Berry is the author of “Banning DDT: How Citizen Activists in Wisconsin Led the Way.”

Berry then went on to explain how too much DDT usage began to disrupt reproduction in several fish and bird species, and the industry’s lack of response “caught them with their pants down” by concerned citizens who then sued to get action and ban the pesticide.

Berry researched this case study of early environmental activism for six years.  He told of the hunters and fishers, bird-watchers, and garden-club ladies such as Lorrie Otto, who dropped off twenty-eight dead robins at the Bayside village offices. He described university professors and scientists such as Joseph Hickey, a professor and researcher in the Department of Wildlife Management at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, who, years after the fact, wept about the suppression of some of his early DDT research.

Some of the lessons to be learned Berry shared with Madison Rotarians included:

  • Economic arguments are important and business should be involved in environmental debates
  • Scientists should engage in public debate
  • Media matters
  • Ecological catastrophes can be avoided
  • Humans are capable of making a global imprint
  • Private citizens can make a difference

Berry grew up in Green Bay and earned undergraduate degrees from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. After more than 20 years as a reporter, columnist and editor for several daily newspapers, he now focuses his work on communicating in the fields of conservation and agriculture. A columnist for The Capital Times newspaper in Madison, Berry lives in Stevens Point.

 

Photo Highlights and Video Clips from 2014 SummerPalooza

–submitted by Juli Aulik, Ellsworth Brown and Paul Riehemann

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It was picture perfect weather for our second annual SummerPalooza held on Saturday, June 14th on the Capitol Square.   We had 2007 people enjoy free admission to the Madison Children’s Museum and outside activities for children, including crafts, a bounce house and a dunk tank.  A parade around the Capitol Square started at noon, and we had 300 participants in the parade with 1000+ viewers.    Shown on the next page are photo highlights.  Our thanks to Steve Goldberg and Deb Gilpin for organizing this year’s event and to 45+ Rotary volunteers who helped make it another great event!

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From left: Steve Goldberg, Renee Moe, Deb Gilpin, Lester Pines, Regina Millner and Roberta Gassman

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Photo 1: Renee Moe with her children Nora and Nick; Photo 2: Tim Stadelman and Karen Kendrick-Hands

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From left: Deb Gilpin, James Tye, Michelle McGrath, Mike Kosolcharoen and Steve Goldberg

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(Photo 1: Tim Stadelman winding up for the pitch; Photos 2 & 3: Mike Kosolcharoen takes a dunk in the tank!)

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Dora Zuniga

Dora Zuniga

 

Photos from Year End Rotary Board Mtg on June 2

Rotary Board Members Gather on June 2 at Food Concepts

Rotary Board Members Gather on June 2 at Food Concepts

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Pictured above: Photo 1: Dick Pearson and Carrie Wall; Photo 2: Terry Heinrichs, Wes Sparkman, Carol Koby and Dick Lovell; Photo 3: Donna Beestman, George Beestman and Ellsworth Brown

President Renee Moe makes her "good-bye" remarks as Club President

President Renee Moe makes her “good-bye” remarks as Club President

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Pictured above: Photo 1: Cheryl DeMars, Lew Harned and Renee Moe; Photo 2: Cindy Waldbillig, Ted Waldbillig, Frank Byrne and Peter Cavi; Photo 3: John Bonsett-Veal, Michelle McGrath, Jan Bonsett-Veal, Dora Zuniga, Denny Carey and Ariana Silva

Kitchen Committee Members: Dave Johnson, Mike Hoesly, Kevin Hoffman, Jim Ruhly, Karl Wellensiek, Gary Peterson, Susan Schmitz and Lew Harned

Kitchen Committee Members: Dave Johnson, Mike Hoesly, Kevin Hoffman, Jim Ruhly, Karl Wellensiek, Gary Peterson, Susan Schmitz and Lew Harned

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Rotarians Share in St. Patrick’s Day Celebration at Fresco on March 17 2014

–submitted by Wendy Wink; photos and video by Mike McKay

Two of the most Irish Ladies: Valerie Kazamias and Wendy Wink

Two of the most Irish Ladies: Valerie Kazamias and Wendy Wink

Sure ‘n begorrah (shure-en-bah-gora), honorary Irishwomen and Irishmen – Downtown Rotarians all – pledged their fealty to “service above self” at the March 17 Rotary Culinary Arts fete at Fresco’s.  St. Patty’s Day couldn’t ‘a been finer.  Tellin’ tales galore, no one gave a thought to countries of origin other than that green land ‘o ours.  ‘Twas a grand eve ta be alive, Irish (or a fibbin’ facsimile), and a member of The Fellowship O’ the Culinartarian.

Fibbing is acceptable on St. Patrick’s Day; di’ ya’ know that?  If truth be told (and it was, sometimes, at least), there could never have been a finer meal in all of this green (snow-laden, though it be) land.  Suspend one part ‘o the four-way test – Is it the Truth?  Sure ‘n the rest outweigh that ‘n for a few hours of joviality– fair to all, build goodwill and better friendships, beneficial to all—practiced to the finest extent by this little band of Fellows, the Fellowship of the Culinartarian,  17 o’ us on the 17th, that’s the truth, told by all in attendance and every leprechaun in the land, or at least those on State Street.

Cathy O'Durham

Cathy O’Durham

Launched by those leprechauns, Cathy O’ Durham and Valerie
O’ Kazamias
, the Fellowship O’ the Culinartarian joined hands and sang “When Irish Eyes are Shining”.  (No, actually, we didn’t, but we could have if asked.  What really happened was truth tellin’ over cocktails of either Champagne or a delicious wine blend and hors d’oeuvres of tender flank steak rolls covering fresh arugula and globe-shaped green risotto cakes covered with crispy bacon strips sitting on a mound of creamy Ireland.  Yes, Ireland.)

All the Fellowship (or, almost all) wore colorful bowler hats, some green, some shamrock-covered and were seated, followed by a stirring welcome from O’ Durham and her introduction of Chef John, a tall, smiling fellow, recognizable because he was the only soul not wearing green.  He was charming, explaining his approach to the meal and the feast awaiting Culinartarians.  He admitted he loved the challenge – a traditional meal, but not.  He accomplished a marvel.

The feast and festivities launched with three songs from Steve O’ Goldberg, the resident Culinartarian troubadour (say that a couple of times over a wine cocktail).  So glorious was his voice, no Irish pipe nor drums were needed.  Our bard, 20 years a’singin’ in Irish pubs with fellows, O’ Goldberg leapt onto a chair (yes, he did) to regale the Fellowship with the tale of the rationale for Irish tunes – three categories be they: nonsense, drinking, and rebel.  We were in for all three!  The titles of the songs were never given, but the gist of them was: “Mrs. Murphy’s Chowder”, “Irish Jubilee and Cassidy” (we were delighted we were in for less than the full 25 verses), and “Johnson’s Motor Car”.  More later.

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The Culinartarians were served by sweet, lively, and fully-green hatted wait staff, pleasant and delighted, also, that there were less than 25 verses, commenting on O’ Goldberg’s superb voice, memory and rendition.

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“And so,” you say, “how was the food and drink?”  Absolutely out of this Ol’ Irish world.  Beginning with an amuse bouche (yes, even the French are Irish on St. Patrick’s Day) that was a superb, creamy veloute of potato soup topped with what Chef John described as a “potato chip”, but really was a lovely floating, crispy topping to the soup.  Apparently, Irish are allowed to lick their soup cup because many among the Fellowship were caught tongues a’lickin’.

“And a salad?” you say.  Well, what a salad.  Some called this far more than a salad.  Sitting atop a grassy island (you knew I’d write this) of mixed greens delicately touched by sherry vinaigrette were scotch eggs (even the Scots are Irish on St. Patrick’s Day).  And, oh my, were those eggs out of this Irish world!  How the heck Chef John managed to cover eggs with shaved pork butt that tasted like superior sausage, cook the whole item, then slice them in half and place them onto the greens, is beyond us.  Of course, we were swooning and awing and drooling and downing these luscious items.  Served with the scotch eggs was an Adami Prosecco, bubbling away in Champaign glasses.  We said we might not have needed more, but more came to us, and more we ate, and laughed, and cheered.

The entree was thick slices of corned beef that had been roasted (yes, roasted and, yes, even the Corned are Irish on St. Patrick’s Day) beautifully hung over (cute, eh?) colcannon (potatoes mashed with roasted Brussels sprouts), a side of roasted carrots, and “house made 1000 island dressing” that doesn’t come close to describing the horseradish glory of this dipping sauce.  Some (moi) ate the whole thing; some took a bit home for the wee ones.  Accompanying this incredible main meal was a delicate Timbach pinot blanc.

“And, dessert?” you say.  Well, how can a tale-teller describe this?  Called a “Guinness chocolate cake” as stated on the menu simply does not do justice to this sculpture and taste extravaganza.  Follow me, if you dare: it looked like a slightly singed dahlia – a beautiful flower, with meringue petals lightly touched by flame to caramelize the peaks, under which was mint iced cream and a wafer of Guinness chocolate cake.  This had seated, at its side, a truly glorious (and lickable, if you dared) Irish whiskey caramel sauce.  Some Culinartarians asked for seconds.  Ask and ye shall receive replied the green-hatted wait staff.  A perfect port, Graham’s Six Grapes, was served to accompany this astonishing dessert.

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But, there were two endings to draw the evening to a close: O’ Durham thanked the Fellowship of the Culinartarians, paying special tribute to the Fellowship for their joviality and to spouses and friends for their patience.  This was followed by… O’ Goldberg, who rose, literally to the top of a chair to sing us through to the end of the evening.  The last songs: “How did Ireland get its name?” (or something like that) and, as O’ Goldberg fibbed to the audience of happy Culinartarians, the “Only Irish Love Song” which started more like a wife-murder and ended happily.

This tale does not include the claim, so certain, that St. Patrick was Greek Orthodox and that St. Patrick’s Day started blue, not green, becoming green as it passed across the seas.  “Is it the truth?”  Only the Irish know.  And they know, all great evenings end happily with shamrocks, blarney, and joy.  Many, many thanks to O’ Kazamias, O’ Durham, Chef John, his crew, and our evening’s bard, O’ Goldberg.