Author Archives: gThankYou!

Rotary Club of Madison Annual Fund Drive a Success!

From Renee Moe, 2011-12 Fund Drive ChairRenee Moe Photo:

Thanks to the participation of 410 of our members – and more who have shared they still plan to contribute – we have exceeded our $130,000 annual fund drive goal.

Much appreciation to each and every donor, the fund drive committee, members who donated incentives for our weekly drawings, our anonymous donor who encouraged numerous members to give for the first time with an innovative match gift, Pat and Jayne in the office, and a special thanks to the Irwin A. and Robert D. Goodman Foundation for making a generous gift in memory of Irwin and Bob and their long standing relationship with Downtown Rotary.Madison Rotary Foundation Logo

Our Board of Directors has confirmed that the annual fund drive is the Club’s top philanthropic priority. Thank you for demonstrating your commitment to our Club’s programs through  your financial support.

The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 

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How’s It Going?? – Rotary Club of Madison

From President Paul –

How is your Rotary year going?  Are you getting the most out of your membership?  Have you been able to work on a committee?  Join in fellowship group activities?  I hope so.  If not, jump in!  Not a week goes by that I don’t hear a member’s story about benefits they’ve received through contributing and participating – even just getting to know others at fellowship group events.

Feedback on weekly programs continues to be excellent.  Dave Mollenhoff’s Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer story was rightfully described as mesmerizing.

Please allow me to share a few updates on items from our strategic plan –

  •  Speed Rotary in August rocked.  110 out of 112 members that completed the survey said we should do it again.  Many thanks to Deb Raupp and her committee.  Look for a reprise in the spring.
  • The new member event at the Chazen was a hit – almost 300 attended and feedback indicated all had a grand time.  Thanks Petie Rudy, Virginia Bartelt and committees, and of course our hosts Mary Carr Lee and Russell Panczenko.
  • Scott Haumersen and his committee are working on Rotary Tri-Quest to benefit Dane County Youth our Run-Bike-Golf fundraiser on May 20, 2012.  (Members Jason Beren, Susan Schmitz, and Carrie Wall & Jim Gilmore are pictured below.)
  • Derrick Van Mell has taken on the task of compiling a list of activities that our club may discontinue. Please contact him with ideas.
  • Laura Peck, Steve Goldberg, Wes Sparkman, Deb Archer, Linda Baldwin and their committees continue to lead projects related to our centennial in June 2013.  These include Rotary Plaza by the Madison Children’s Museum, Family Fun Fair and the Centennial Celebration.
  • And, many thanks to Rick Kiley, Paul Ranola and the Social Media Committee.  They are managing this blog, Facebook, LinkedIn and instituted ConstantContact for emails to members.  The emails are much more attractive, and we are gathering statistics on what is being looked at so we can adjust as needed.

How’s it going for me?  Really well.  What continues to amaze me is the spirit with which members embrace volunteer work for the community.  Recently I was asked to recruit a few more members to help on a committee.  The first five members said yes. 

Committee and Fellowship group chairs – remember, there is a standing invitation for you to pen an article for this blog to let members know what you’re up to.  Please remember to include a photo or three.

Wishing you and your family a festive holiday season!  In service,

Paul Riehemann

The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 

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Blackhawk Country Club New Member Event – Rotary Club of Madison

On Tuesday, December 6, our Member Development Committee hosted a New Member Event where over 30 Rotarians met in the morning for coffee at Blackhawk Country Club to enjoy fellowship, the beautiful view, and to help new members learn more about Rotary.

Patty Franson gave a presentation on our club’s proud heritage of philanthropy, Rotary International’s Foundation, our Madison Rotary Foundation, and our Annual Fund Drive. She highlighted the Philanthropy Committee’s focus on stewardship, acknowledgment, celebrating, and promoting how our collective gifts make a difference both locally and internationally. Obviously, since a picture is said to be worth a thousand words, Patty utilized Roth Judd’s famous diagram to help illustrate the link between the Annual Fund Drive and the community grants we provide.

The Annual Fund Drive Committee is encouraging new members to participate, even with a small gift, so that over time they will be able to experience the value of their gift at work locally and internationally.

Rob Stroud, Terry Anderson, and Roth Judd helped Jason Beren with a “Ways To Participate In Rotary” presentation. The discussion emphasized the many opportunities available to participate in Rotary, which also count as make-ups. A number of Rotarians shared personal stories about participating in our own club’s activities and attending meetings at other Rotary Clubs at home and abroad. Hopefully, our new members will be inspired to visit other clubs all over the world, explore and experience the benefits of committee and club service, and participate in the ever-popular fellowship groups.

The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 

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Rotary Club of Madison Fall Membership Event, Chazen Museum of Art

At Chazen Museum of Art, Submitted By Maggie Peterman.

Even the draperies are a work of art… if you enjoy the waltz, you will discover Petra Blaisse’s design for indoor architectural spaces at work in the Chazen Museum of Art lobby.

When closed, the 20-foot-high curtain covers the glass wall with a pattern designed in voile and felt. As it opens, it coils around a LED-studded column with the elegance of the leading man and lady in ABC’s hottest TV series “Dancing With the Stars.”

Russell Panczenko, the museum’s director and Rotary member, gave nearly 300 Madison Rotarians, their guests and prospective members a glimpse of this graceful dance step Thursday night during Rotary’s Special Autumn Fellowship Event in the new $43 million, 86,000-square-foot addition that opened to the Madison community less than a week ago.

Museum docents escorted small groups of visitors through the museum’s 10 new galleries and 22,500-square feet of new exhibition space.

Sporting a classic bow tie, Max Gaebler, a retired minister from the First Unitarian Society of Madison, praised the work of Boston-based architects Machado and Silvetti Associates, as well as display of artwork previously kept in storage.

“It’s so much bigger, so much richer in contents than it was years ago,” says Gaebler, who served the Unitarian congregation more than 35 years. “It now feels like a significant museum.”

Visitors were charmed by the Alexander Calder sculptures in Gallery 10, the Claes Oldenburg Typewriter Eraser in Gallery 12 and the Spirit Wall by an unknown Chinese artist in Gallery 15.
Few could resist the temptation not to touch the display of bottle caps and liquor wrappers a Nigerian university professor sewed together with copper wire.

“This is just amazing,” says Barb Kubly, who is in residential real estate and a prospective member. “It’s phenomenal.”

The museum also features the private collection of Simona and Jerome Chazen whose $25 million gift sparked the expansion.

“This shows you the Chazens really like color and the human figure,” Docent Sandra Loman points out.

One evening is not enough time to absorb all the exhibitions in the building featuring a two-story glass lobby with a limestone “carpet” and a 160-seat auditorium for films and lecutures.

“I’d like to spend more time just looking around,” says Rob Stroud, a Madison attorney and Rotary District Governor-elect. “There are some real interesting pieces here.”

Click photos to enlarge.

 
The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 

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Rotary Madison Fellowships | Scotch Whiskey, Wellness, Bridge

Scotch Whiskey/Lew Harned Society – October 17

Submitted by Ellis Waller, Chair.
The October meeting of the Lew Harned Society took place at Ellis and Katie

Katie & Ellis Waller

Waller’s home in Maple Bluff. About twenty members assembled to taste a variety of single malt Scotch Whiskies. Included in the assortment was a bottle of “Whisky” made in India. Members thought that while it tasted like Scotch Whisky it was certainly not in keeping with the Society’s charter to sample single malt Scotch Whisky.

John Bonsett-Veal

Next month’s meeting is scheduled for Monday, November 14th at the home of Moses Altsech. Those who signed up for this fellowship group receive an email reminder before each meeting, however all Rotary members are invited to attend any of the Society’s events. Please remember to contact the host so that he or she can arrange for proper amounts of food and beverages.

Gary Peterson, Susan Schmitz, & Melanie Ramey

Wellness/Healing Fellowship – October 12, Waisman Center

Submitted by Rob Stroud, Member.
During the evening of October 12, the Wellness Fellowship was treated to a fascinating tour of the Waisman Center and the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds. Eight of us, joined by four Edgewood College Rotaractors, met with the lab manager and his team of experts, all of whom were young, energetic, enthusiastic researchers.

Waisman Center

For those of you who are unfamiliar with it, the Waisman Center is largely a center for brain research.  We learned about EEG’s, MRI’s and PET scans and how each of them measures different brain functions in different ways. We saw how Ansel makes radioactive isotopes for PET scans and how Steve uses magnetic imaging to record the brain’s response to pain. We saw how EEG technology has been made easier to use and easier to interpret results. We heard about the Center’s studies on the brains of Tibetan monks during meditation.  Then, to cap off the evening, the executive director of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds told us about their work in investigating and teaching mind awareness. Her presentation showed us some of the ways that the research results are being applied to real life problems.

Our thanks go to our fellowship chair, Frank Stein, and to the wonderful people at the Waisman Center for an informative evening.

Bridge Fellowship – October 11, nancy young,  host

Submitted by Mary Helen Becker.
The bridge fellowship has met for more than a decade and welcomes new

Mary Helen Becker & Paul Madsen, seated; L-R, Front: Lori Kay, Sally Phelps, Lynn Phelps, Jon Udell, Susan Udell, Mary Hamre, Jim Hamre, Jim Ebben & Nancy Young. Back: Brooks Becker, Dick Rieselbach, Arlan Kay, Jed Engeler & Mike Lovejoy.

members. We meet in members’ homes most of the time, but occasionally gather at a local club for dinner and bridge. Members get to know each other better and strengthen friendships.

L-R, Foreground: Brooks Becker, Jim Hamre, Sally Phelps & Linda Lovejoy; Background: Arlan Kay, Lori Kay, Dick Rieselbach & Nina Rieselbach

We meet on the second Tuesday of the month, but have recently tried to hold an occasional game on a Thursday to accommodate players who are not available on the second Tuesday. For more information, contact the Rotary office or Mary Helen Becker.

 
 
 
The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 

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Madison Rotary — Dinner & Discussion Group

Do you Like to Eat? Do you Like Stimulating Conversation?

If you answered “yes” to these two questions, you might enjoy the Dinner and Discussion Fellowship Group.  The group held its first meeting of the year on September 22 at Bonfyre.  Eight eager Rotarians (pictured below) joined in a spirited discussion and dined on fine food.

Back (L-R): Deb Raupp, Jacqui Sakowski, Jim Ruhly, Carol Koby, Karen Christianson & Bill Muehl. Front (L-R): Robyn Kitson & Denny Carey

The group discussed the purpose of the fellowship and decided that we prefer a low-key, open-ended discussion rather than a rigid agenda.  We would like to have a casual night out with food and conversation. We plan to discuss philosophy-behind-the-news rather than current events.  We’re committed to listening to each other’s viewpoints and learning from each other, regardless of beliefs or opinions.  We invite all perspectives and beliefs to deepen the conversation.

The next meeting is planned for Monday, October 10, at 6:00pm at Great Dane-Hilldale.  Please join us! If you enjoy food and conversation, this group is right up your alley!

Contact the Rotary office at office@rotarymadison.org or 255-9164 to sign up and to receive invitations to attend the Dinner and Discussion Fellowship Group meetings.

Thanks to Deb Raupp for this post.
 
The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 
 

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Rotary Madison — Notable Books Fellowship

So, what goes on at a monthly meeting of the Rotary Notable Books Group you ask?

A lot of discussion about interesting books! For example, on September 22, the Rotary Notable Book Group met at the Takara Japanese restaurant to discuss the book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. The book has been on the New York Times best seller list for many months.

Notable Books Fellowship Group (L-R): Ruth Ann Schoer, Darrell Behnke, Rich Leffler, Joan Leffler, Frank Stein and Roberta Sladky.

Frank Stein, a member of the group, gives us the following summary of their meeting:

Essentially the author describes the case of Henrietta Lacks, a mother of five who died in 1951 from cervical cancer. While in treatment at the noted Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, a slice of cancerous tissue was taken from the cervix and given to a laboratory scientist for analysis. The cancer cells in the tissue proved to be very much alive and continued to reproduce at a tremendous pace. This was a great scientific breakthrough since previous tissue cultures used in laboratory research containing cancer cells usually died within days.

The most fascinating part of the book was the depiction of the Lack’s family.  They were descendants of black slaves from Virginia who lived on the edges of society in poverty with poor education and lack of opportunities to better their lives. Another aspect of the story was the question of informed consent in research studies and who benefits from research that uses tissues from someone’s body? We had a lively discussion of the abuse of research in the lack of informed consent to patients in the past, such as with syphilis
patients and prisoners who were given live cancer cells.  In this book Skloot examines specifically how the exploitation of poor, uneducated people who are unaware of the research taking place can lead to legal dilemmas especially when huge profits are made on the basis of the findings. Should patients have any financial gains from tissues taken from their bodies?  This question has not been completely settled and the courts have been split in their verdicts.

In summary this was an excellent book that raised many scientific issues and described a culture of poverty that still exists in this country.

The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 
 

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