Tag Archives: Rotary International

Celebrating 100 Years: A Look Back in History

As we celebrate our 100th anniversary, our History Sub-Committee is taking a look back in our club’s rich history and is sharing highlights from the past century.  This week’s message is shared by committee member Rich Leffler:

Committee on Code of Ethics

The Rotary Code of Ethics for Business Men of All Lines

At one time, Rotary had an astounding Code of Ethics, as once required by the Bylaws. But for reasons that are unclear, the Code fell into disuse. Once, it was widely published and distributed. Today, it can hardly be found. We are publishing this remarkable Code of Ethics here, along with a brief history of its rise and fall as a tenet of Rotary.

In 1912, Rotary president Glenn C. Mead proposed that the newly formed Business Methods Committee prepare a code of business ethics for “the advancement of business morality.” (The Rotarian Commemorative Centennial Edition [June 2005], 89) The chair of the committee was Robert W. Hunt of Sioux City, Iowa. Much of the Code was composed by an unofficial committee of Hunt’s fellow Iowa Rotarians while en route to the June 1914 convention in Houston. One of these Iowans, J. R. Perkins, explained that “the articles of the code were revised both as to phrasing and content. The third, eighth, and ninth articles, in their basal ideas . . . grew out of the general discussion. The tenth article, which in the writer’s judgment is the highest ethical upreach of them all, did not appear in [the original] manuscript, tho it was held to be germane to the whole and really expressive of what is fundamental in Rotary.” Perkins also explained that the stunning final paragraph of the “Summary” was “a bit of pragmatic philosophy from William James, but he really borrowed it from European philosophy.”(J. R. Perkins, “History of the Rotary Code of Ethics,” The Rotarian 10, no. 2 [February 1917], 119–21).

The Rotary Code of Ethics for Business Men of All Lines, printed here, was adopted by the Sixth Annual Convention of the International Association of Rotary Clubs meeting in San Francisco in July 1915. Great faith was put into the power of the Code. A report to the 1919 Convention argued that “if the business men of the world would adopt the Rotary Code of Ethics as their rule of conduct, as their guide in commercial intercourse, the world would be a safe place for democracies. . . . Had the business world been operating according to a standard of practices which conform to our Code of Ethics, does any real Rotarian believe that we would have been plunged into a night of horrors such as lasted from August 1914, to November 1918?” (Robert H. Timmons, “Report of Committee on Publicity,” Proceedings of the Tenth Annual Convention . . . [July 16–20, 1919], 430–31)

In 1921, when the Rotary Club of Madison celebrated the sixteenth birthday of Rotary with a full-page spread in the Wisconsin State Journal, it proudly published the Code of Ethics and declared that Rotary is “based on the following Code of Ethics.” (WSJ, February 23, 1921) And the History of our Club recalls that in the mid-1920s the Club’s “leadership began to use it [the Code] as the focal point of a number of somber investigations into the allegedly unethical business dealings of some of its most prominent members.” (John Jenkins, History of the Rotary Club of Madison [Madison, 1990], 56) This latter point deserves scrutiny in future blogs.

But as early as 1921, there were objections to the Code. Ironically, it was Rotary President Mead who asked “Is the Rotary Code of Ethics a code of ethics at all? Is it not a confession of faith or a creed?” (The Rotarian 19, no 1 [July 1921], 39) Similarly, in 1924, Rotary president Guy Gundaker echoed Mead when he observed that the Code was “more in the line of a confession of faith, or a creed.. . . [The Code] should be specific, plain-spoken, and expressed in commonly understood terms; also that its provisions should be given as rules of conduct expressed as ‘Shall and Shall Not.’ This, of course, does not preclude preambles to any of the sections of an informative character.” (The Rotarian 25, no. 3 [September 1924], 42) By 1931, Rotary began to consider itself less a business club than a service club, and Rotary International adopted its “Aims and Objects,” which had application beyond business matters. The Board appointed a committee to revise the Code of Ethics. The Code continued to be published in the Manual of Procedure, but it was no longer separately distributed. In 1943, the Four-Way Test was adopted, and it became a sort of substitute code of ethics with broad application.

In 1951–52, the Board discontinued the distribution of the Code of Ethics entirely. In 1977, an attempt was made to “revive the publication and dissemination” of the Code. But the following year, the Board determined that “because of changes in the realm of business and professional life since the adoption of the code, any revision and updating for the purpose of re-instituting the publication and distribution of the code would be ineffectual.” So the Board voted not to revise the Code or to distribute it. In 1980, reference to the Code was removed from the RI Bylaws.

Although the Four-Way Test is often referred to as a Code of Ethics, it has never been so designated. In fact, the 1981 Manual of Procedure stated that “The Four-Way Test should not be referred to as a ‘code’ in any sense.” So, presently, Rotary has no code of ethics. Our Club is, however, as concerned as ever about ethical behavior, and our annual Ethics Symposium program extends outward to high school students in the Madison area. It is one important way of serving the community.

This introduction is partially based on Doug Rudman, “The Rotary Code of Ethics,” The Rotary Global History Fellowship (An Internet Project) (http://rotaryfirst100.org/history/headings/ethics.htm and Rudman, “Is the Four-Way Test a Code of Ethics?” (ibid.).

 

Blackhawk Country Club New Member Event – Rotary Club of Madison

On Tuesday, December 6, our Member Development Committee hosted a New Member Event where over 30 Rotarians met in the morning for coffee at Blackhawk Country Club to enjoy fellowship, the beautiful view, and to help new members learn more about Rotary.

Patty Franson gave a presentation on our club’s proud heritage of philanthropy, Rotary International’s Foundation, our Madison Rotary Foundation, and our Annual Fund Drive. She highlighted the Philanthropy Committee’s focus on stewardship, acknowledgment, celebrating, and promoting how our collective gifts make a difference both locally and internationally. Obviously, since a picture is said to be worth a thousand words, Patty utilized Roth Judd’s famous diagram to help illustrate the link between the Annual Fund Drive and the community grants we provide.

The Annual Fund Drive Committee is encouraging new members to participate, even with a small gift, so that over time they will be able to experience the value of their gift at work locally and internationally.

Rob Stroud, Terry Anderson, and Roth Judd helped Jason Beren with a “Ways To Participate In Rotary” presentation. The discussion emphasized the many opportunities available to participate in Rotary, which also count as make-ups. A number of Rotarians shared personal stories about participating in our own club’s activities and attending meetings at other Rotary Clubs at home and abroad. Hopefully, our new members will be inspired to visit other clubs all over the world, explore and experience the benefits of committee and club service, and participate in the ever-popular fellowship groups.

The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 

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Rotaract Tour and Supper, 12.01.11

Dan Larson, Chair and Jacqui Sakowski, members of the Rotaract Advisory Committee, accompanied students from Edgewood College and UW Madison on a tour of Full Compass Systems and to supper at The Imperial Garden Chinese Restaurant.

Roxanne Wenzel, VP Sales & Marketing, left above, guided the party through showrooms, recording studios, the colossal 80,000 sqaure foot warehouse and the a la carte bistro.

Johnathon Lipp, founder took the students through the history of the firm to the present day. The students were truly inspired to learn how Full Compass had bucked the recession and grown dramatically by doing the opposite of conventional business wisdom.

During a half-hour Q&A session Johnathon shared some of the downs as well as many of the ups, so everyone left with a taste of success underpinned with a good sense of the reality of managing a growing business in a fast changing industry.

Cool space, fast growing, hi-tech, rewarding, inspiring, were the words much used over a luscious buffet style meal at The Imperial Garden Chinese Restaurant.

Many thanks to Full Compass Systems and to Imperial Garden Chinese Restuarant for their time and contributions to this fun evening.

The Full Compass goody bags and cartons of Chinese food were enthusiastically apprreciated by our group.

The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service. It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013. Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach. It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs.

Rotary Club of Madison Fall Membership Event, Chazen Museum of Art

At Chazen Museum of Art, Submitted By Maggie Peterman.

Even the draperies are a work of art… if you enjoy the waltz, you will discover Petra Blaisse’s design for indoor architectural spaces at work in the Chazen Museum of Art lobby.

When closed, the 20-foot-high curtain covers the glass wall with a pattern designed in voile and felt. As it opens, it coils around a LED-studded column with the elegance of the leading man and lady in ABC’s hottest TV series “Dancing With the Stars.”

Russell Panczenko, the museum’s director and Rotary member, gave nearly 300 Madison Rotarians, their guests and prospective members a glimpse of this graceful dance step Thursday night during Rotary’s Special Autumn Fellowship Event in the new $43 million, 86,000-square-foot addition that opened to the Madison community less than a week ago.

Museum docents escorted small groups of visitors through the museum’s 10 new galleries and 22,500-square feet of new exhibition space.

Sporting a classic bow tie, Max Gaebler, a retired minister from the First Unitarian Society of Madison, praised the work of Boston-based architects Machado and Silvetti Associates, as well as display of artwork previously kept in storage.

“It’s so much bigger, so much richer in contents than it was years ago,” says Gaebler, who served the Unitarian congregation more than 35 years. “It now feels like a significant museum.”

Visitors were charmed by the Alexander Calder sculptures in Gallery 10, the Claes Oldenburg Typewriter Eraser in Gallery 12 and the Spirit Wall by an unknown Chinese artist in Gallery 15.
Few could resist the temptation not to touch the display of bottle caps and liquor wrappers a Nigerian university professor sewed together with copper wire.

“This is just amazing,” says Barb Kubly, who is in residential real estate and a prospective member. “It’s phenomenal.”

The museum also features the private collection of Simona and Jerome Chazen whose $25 million gift sparked the expansion.

“This shows you the Chazens really like color and the human figure,” Docent Sandra Loman points out.

One evening is not enough time to absorb all the exhibitions in the building featuring a two-story glass lobby with a limestone “carpet” and a 160-seat auditorium for films and lecutures.

“I’d like to spend more time just looking around,” says Rob Stroud, a Madison attorney and Rotary District Governor-elect. “There are some real interesting pieces here.”

Click photos to enlarge.

 
The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 

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Rotary Madison Fellowships | Scotch Whiskey, Wellness, Bridge

Scotch Whiskey/Lew Harned Society – October 17

Submitted by Ellis Waller, Chair.
The October meeting of the Lew Harned Society took place at Ellis and Katie

Katie & Ellis Waller

Waller’s home in Maple Bluff. About twenty members assembled to taste a variety of single malt Scotch Whiskies. Included in the assortment was a bottle of “Whisky” made in India. Members thought that while it tasted like Scotch Whisky it was certainly not in keeping with the Society’s charter to sample single malt Scotch Whisky.

John Bonsett-Veal

Next month’s meeting is scheduled for Monday, November 14th at the home of Moses Altsech. Those who signed up for this fellowship group receive an email reminder before each meeting, however all Rotary members are invited to attend any of the Society’s events. Please remember to contact the host so that he or she can arrange for proper amounts of food and beverages.

Gary Peterson, Susan Schmitz, & Melanie Ramey

Wellness/Healing Fellowship – October 12, Waisman Center

Submitted by Rob Stroud, Member.
During the evening of October 12, the Wellness Fellowship was treated to a fascinating tour of the Waisman Center and the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds. Eight of us, joined by four Edgewood College Rotaractors, met with the lab manager and his team of experts, all of whom were young, energetic, enthusiastic researchers.

Waisman Center

For those of you who are unfamiliar with it, the Waisman Center is largely a center for brain research.  We learned about EEG’s, MRI’s and PET scans and how each of them measures different brain functions in different ways. We saw how Ansel makes radioactive isotopes for PET scans and how Steve uses magnetic imaging to record the brain’s response to pain. We saw how EEG technology has been made easier to use and easier to interpret results. We heard about the Center’s studies on the brains of Tibetan monks during meditation.  Then, to cap off the evening, the executive director of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds told us about their work in investigating and teaching mind awareness. Her presentation showed us some of the ways that the research results are being applied to real life problems.

Our thanks go to our fellowship chair, Frank Stein, and to the wonderful people at the Waisman Center for an informative evening.

Bridge Fellowship – October 11, nancy young,  host

Submitted by Mary Helen Becker.
The bridge fellowship has met for more than a decade and welcomes new

Mary Helen Becker & Paul Madsen, seated; L-R, Front: Lori Kay, Sally Phelps, Lynn Phelps, Jon Udell, Susan Udell, Mary Hamre, Jim Hamre, Jim Ebben & Nancy Young. Back: Brooks Becker, Dick Rieselbach, Arlan Kay, Jed Engeler & Mike Lovejoy.

members. We meet in members’ homes most of the time, but occasionally gather at a local club for dinner and bridge. Members get to know each other better and strengthen friendships.

L-R, Foreground: Brooks Becker, Jim Hamre, Sally Phelps & Linda Lovejoy; Background: Arlan Kay, Lori Kay, Dick Rieselbach & Nina Rieselbach

We meet on the second Tuesday of the month, but have recently tried to hold an occasional game on a Thursday to accommodate players who are not available on the second Tuesday. For more information, contact the Rotary office or Mary Helen Becker.

 
 
 
The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 

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Outstanding Fall Semesters at UW_Madison and Edgewood College Rotaract Clubs

Outstanding September meetings of Edgewood College and UW-Madison Rotaract Clubs, have set the stage for a great fall on our local campuses.

These informative and engaging meetings, are open to all Rotary Club members, and District officers, and we can all benefit from attending.

The meetings on the two campuses are slightly different in format, although both run from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.

At Edgewood they generally have quite a bit to share about their volunteering activities before a 45-60 minute presentation from a professional from the community who challenges the audience to think differently about how they go to work. In September students and guests heard from an entrepreneur who had taken the risk of trying new ventures, she took the lessons from each as she drew a curtain over the past and moved confidently and more aware into her future, with plans not to repeat her past mistakes.

On UW- Campus  a short update on volunteering, is traditionally followed by a 10-15 minute presentation by an international student, who will share about the culture of their home country.  In September, Erman bought our friendship with Turkish Delight, which he passed around the group as he spoke. He definitely left the podium with many many new friends!  UW students were challenged to think a little less selfishly about their networking agenda in their professional presentation, and they very quickly realized that the more they serve, the more they will be served by the people in their lives.

With first class speakers, and students who lap up every drop of experience and wisdom we can share, these meeting should be unmissable.

Fall Schedule:-

UW-Madison – Grainger Hall

October 25th – Ralph Kauten, Biotech Entrepreneur, founder of Promega, PanVera, Mirus Bio and  Quintessence BioSciences.

November 15th – Ken Waysalik, International Business Consultant who works with US companies to expand their businesses into global markets.

December 6th – Tom Guerin , VP of Research & Development for Kerry Ingredients & Flavors, Americas, who travels the globe to ensure that products fit the markets they serve.

Edgewood College – Predolin Hall

October 19th – Carmen Porco, a member of our Rotary Club who will discuss community issues and answers in the works.

November 9th – Moses Altsech,  Rotarian and Edgewood College faculty will provide a workshop on creating a great resume.

November 30th – Annemarie Spitznagle, will share lessons learned in founding and operating Bloom Bake Shop in Middleton, WI.

The Rotary Club of Madison has 500+ members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service. It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013. Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach. It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs.

 

Madison Rotary — Dinner & Discussion Group

Do you Like to Eat? Do you Like Stimulating Conversation?

If you answered “yes” to these two questions, you might enjoy the Dinner and Discussion Fellowship Group.  The group held its first meeting of the year on September 22 at Bonfyre.  Eight eager Rotarians (pictured below) joined in a spirited discussion and dined on fine food.

Back (L-R): Deb Raupp, Jacqui Sakowski, Jim Ruhly, Carol Koby, Karen Christianson & Bill Muehl. Front (L-R): Robyn Kitson & Denny Carey

The group discussed the purpose of the fellowship and decided that we prefer a low-key, open-ended discussion rather than a rigid agenda.  We would like to have a casual night out with food and conversation. We plan to discuss philosophy-behind-the-news rather than current events.  We’re committed to listening to each other’s viewpoints and learning from each other, regardless of beliefs or opinions.  We invite all perspectives and beliefs to deepen the conversation.

The next meeting is planned for Monday, October 10, at 6:00pm at Great Dane-Hilldale.  Please join us! If you enjoy food and conversation, this group is right up your alley!

Contact the Rotary office at office@rotarymadison.org or 255-9164 to sign up and to receive invitations to attend the Dinner and Discussion Fellowship Group meetings.

Thanks to Deb Raupp for this post.
 
The Rotary Club of Madison has 500 members from business, academia, healthcare and public and community service.  It is one of the ten largest Rotary International clubs in the world and will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2013.  Rotary International is a service club with local and global reach.  It’s 34,000 clubs in over 200 countries have 1.2 million members who meet weekly to develop friendships, learn, and work together to address important humanitarian needs. 
 

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